Ragdoll Cat Color Change After Shaving Fur

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Ragdoll Cat Color Change After Shaving Fur

Ragdoll cats are pointed cats, much like Birmans, Siamese and more.

As Wikipedia states, “Point coloration refers to animal coat coloration with a pale body and relatively darker extremities, i.e. the face, ears, feet, tail, and (in males) scrotum. It is most recognized as the coloration of Siamese and related breeds of cat, but can be found in rabbits, rats, sheep, and horses as well.”

I noticed how extreme the extremities can change when Charlie and Trigg’s diet was switched from dry and wet food to wet food only. In addition to getting slimmer and trimmer, Charlie became much lighter. Check out these two posts to see photos of that change:

Interestingly enough, a reader wrote me the other day, sending photos of her Ragdoll Cat shaved and his hair growing back:

“I wanted to share these pictures of my Stanlee before, when and after I had him shaved. Big regret!  Except for his color points, I loved Stanlee’s mostly cream body. His fur grew back very dark after I had him shaved. Per the vet, it grew back this way for the same reason his points are dark – they are the coolest parts of his body. Don’t shave, if you want to keep your Ragdoll light. The proof is in the pictures.  Stanlee’s fur closest to his skin is in fact growing back a lighter color; it will take forever for him to be light colored again though. I was thinking of shaving him again but only as short as the lighter color growing in.”

Ragdoll Cat Color Change After Shaving

Comments (14)

  1. wow i never heard of such a thing. i can see maybe food changes but shaving ? what a trip. either way your cat is gorgeous and i’m sure he felt much cooler with a shave (if that is why you did it) i’m going to shave my black and white. i wonder if his color will change? very interesting topic.

    1. Haha no, no it wont affect the coloration of your black and white cat. This is mostly unique to colorpoint cats and cats whose coat changes colors due to body temperature. You are safe to shave your cat.

  2. I’m still confused about the changes of hair color (but I failed physics three times so there’s that…). I have read that if you remove the hair by brushing then it does not change color which then goes against the whole “cooler area = darker fur” explanation. I mean brushing like furminating. When I do that with Yoda it looks/feels as if her hair is clipped so I’m extrapolating that it would be fairly similar (of course there may be a human evisceration involved in attempting to furminate a cat!).

    I’ve also read that the more than you clip it (it terms of how many times) it will get successively darker but then cycle back to lighter. Again, huh?

    Also, shaving hair does not effect the root – where the hair gets it’s DNA “messages” from. Ladies when we shave our legs, our hair does NOT get thicker, it might feel that way because it stubby but it’s not scientifically possible to change the DNA by doing something topical (and you should totally listen to me with my 3x physics failures, I obviously know of what I speak!!).

    Prossimo came full of mats so there was no choice but to shave him. I have no A/C and live in the worst possible architecture/layout for that so my house gets “microwave hot”. The first summer I shaved him twice. Once at the beginning of May – massive heat wave and he was obviously uncomfortable. 2nd time in late August since it had grown back enough and the heat was unrelenting. (3x in less than a year) His hair grew back significantly darker on his back.

    Last summer I shaved him myself over the course of 2 weeks and then took him in for a quick touch up for his belly and “armpits”. Again, this winter he was quite grey, more than the winter prior, on his back.

    I shaved parts of his back, armpits and belly 2 months ago because I discovered patches of mats but the hair is slow to grow back in so it’s hard to tell what will happen.

    Jenny, the pictures of Charlie that you link to are kind of shocking – that is an AMAZING difference!

    1. I don’t know if this will help but:
      Pointing is caused by a genetic mutation. The animals that have it have an enzyme in their skin that is inactive at warmer temperatures so a firm brushing shouldn’t cause enough of a dip in temperature at the skin level for the enzyme to become active. Which brings me to my next point, hair is really really really good at insulating. For me personally it doesn’t matter if it’s 1 inch or 12 it’s the same amount of warm but 1/2 an inch and under and I’m sleeping with a hat on.

  3. We live in Central Florida on the Gulf Coast. I’ve been tempted a few times this summer to shave our Ragdoll, Molly. She is always indoors, but still seems to feel the heat unless we keep the AC at 72* or lower. I like it lower too! But I would hate to have her beautiful cream color darken. We are transitioning to mostly wet. I keep the dry out. They eat it less and less. But I feed them wet food twice a day with plenty of broth and added vitamins.

  4. Fascinating topic, Jenny! Wow! I had no idea about any of this! Well, Charlie and Stanlee (lurve that name, btw) are still gorgeous as can be!

    Big hugs!

    Patti & Miss Pink Sugarbelle 🙂 <3

  5. I just read all three articles – thank you, Jenny, and Stanlee’s mom! My Ragdoll boys were never shaved so I had no experience with that. Gizmo was a kitten when he was given to us, developed his color points as he grew. Moosie was about 11 months old (according to our vet) when I adopted him; his points were already dark. Both boys’ “back fur” darkened as they grew older. Their tummies and manes stayed light (white to cream-colored) their whole lives.

    Thanks to everyone for the new information and a very interesting discussion!

  6. I saw a desk extension which would be PURRfect for our floppy cat, Ben.
    He loves to be on the desk, with his head on my keyboard. I noticed a photo of a desk extension. Ben is only 8 months old but he is already a big boy. We also have 2 Bali’s but Ben is the one for whom I desparately need a place where he can be close to me while I work.

  7. Zelda was shaved because she spent a lot of time coughing and had stools full of hair. The fur grew back the same color and longer than ever. Now I try to keep it under control with the Scaredy-cut. She looks “ruffled” since I am not a pro but the fur is manageable.
    After Zelda was shaved, Zoe (also a ragdoll) did not recognize her. She would sneak a peak around the corner and then run away from this stranger!

  8. hi guys please i have a beautiful cream almost white ragdoll. i shaved her not all the way but she was so furry and matting it was starting to get hot here in perth australia. i shaved her a month ago and about 2 weeks ago noticed dark grey and orange on her back. i thought maybe she accidently got out the front and got underneth the neighbours car or something but now got worse. i juag tried washing her and ive realised its not dirt her fur has changed to an afull colour. what ca. i do i want my pretty white cat back. she doesnt even look ragdoll anymore. i am freaking out will she go back to normal? im never shaving her again!!!

    1. Nope, she’s ruined forever might as well put her up for adoption.
      I’m joking. Her fur should go back to normal by itself but it’s going to take a while. I shaved my cat and it took around 6 months for all the blunted hairs to fall out so I figure it will take at least 6 months but it may take a year depending on the weather. Warm=White.

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