Ozone Therapy For Cats

Last Updated on September 21, 2021 by Jenny

If you’ve ever looked online for alternative ways to help your unwell cat, you might’ve come across ozone therapy. You could also have found articles around using ozone to treat humans too.

When it comes to ozone therapy for cats, it might be worth discussing with your vet as it can help with a wide variety of conditions and illnesses.

Caymus with his favorite shoe
Caymus curled up with a favorite shoe
When it comes to ozone therapy for cats, it might be worth discussing with your vet as it can help with a wide variety of conditions and illnesses. Click To Tweet

Please note that this article may contain affiliate links. That means that if you buy something, I may earn a small commission. You can read my full disclosure at the bottom of the page.

What is ozone therapy for cats?

In order to understand a little more about what ozone therapy is, you need to start with ozone itself. Ozone is simply a molecule that’s made up of three oxygen atoms – so it’s O3. The normal oxygen we breathe is O2, meaning ozone is just oxygen with an extra atom. Ozone has been used to treat conditions in humans for over 100 years, but more recently it’s being tried out as a therapy for pets, with great success.

Dr. Margo Roman answers this question in this live on Facebook here at time stamps: 18:50-20:52“Ozone is mostly oxygen – it’s 97% oxygen and 3% O3.You basically take pure oxygen and run it through a corona discharge, which gives you O3 and that’s combined and the O3 is very transient and when it gets into the system it oxidizes the system.It sets up what’s called hormesis – where the body thinks it’s getting oxidized and you get oxidation happening when you exercise, when you put your body at stress, but then your body compensates. When it does this, it increases the amount of oxygen in your body which then wakes up your mitochondria because your mitochondria are your little building blocks and powerhouses for your cells and they are the ones that produce energyAnd so, you are giving more fuel to them, so the whole metabolism in the cells starts to keep going.So, you have inflammation and when you have inflammation, you need more circulation, you need more oxygen in the system to bring down the inflammation, so the ozone is actually bringing oxygen to bring down the inflammation and increase the circulationAt the same time, what O3 does, when it hits the tissue, it kills viruses, bacteria and fungi instantly, so it kills viruses on contact as well as all bacteria pretty much. But it’s only at that location, it’s not systematically treating every little piece of your body, you know, with an antibiotic and staying there a long time – whereas an antibiotic is taken and it stays there a long time.Ozone, when you treat it, it just takes it out and then floods the area with huge amounts of oxygen.It’s a high oxygen therapy, but there’s an O3 component.”

Purchase an Ozone machine for cats (but make sure you have your ozone vet’s guidance)

What does Ozone do?

The idea is that ozone gives your body a higher concentration of oxygen. This can then act in a number of different ways to either combat illnesses, heal wounds or just make your cat more comfortable. Some of the possible benefits include decreasing inflammation in muscles or other tissue, stimulating the production of cykotines which helps to activate the immune system of your cat, and it can destroy unwanted cells including bacteria and fungi to help reduce or remove infections. This makes it a fantastic, natural remedy for a wide range of problems your cate might be suffering.

Caymus with the Yeowww! Catnip Toy
Caymus with the Yeowww! Catnip toy he loved

What does it treat?

There are various different conditions that ozone has shown to be effective in treating, ranging from chronic illness to temporary injuries. The flexible properties of ozone mean that, depending on how it is administered, it can offer various benefits. Ozone therapy has successfully been used to help treat the following conditions in cats:
Skin conditions including infections, allergic reactions, non-healing wounds and abscesses
Inflammatory issues including through the digestive system and the bowels, including *soothing diarrhea
*Viral infections, such as feline leukemia
*Cancerous tissue
*Failure of organs, such as kidneys or the liver
*Autoimmune conditions
*Pain
That last one may seem vague, but ozone is a highly effective pain relief and regardless of what might be upsetting your feline friend, ozone could at least improve their quality of life and help to bring down the pain for a few days. It’s always important to identify the source of the pain, but if it’s an accompaniment to other conditions, particularly in old age, then ozone is an ideal option for pain relief that doesn’t rely on drugs.

What does it treat?

There are various different conditions that ozone has shown to be effective in treating, ranging from chronic illness to temporary injuries. The flexible properties of ozone mean that, depending on how it is administered, it can offer various benefits. Ozone therapy has successfully been used to help treat the following conditions in cats:
Skin conditions including infections, allergic reactions, non-healing wounds and abscesses
Inflammatory issues including through the digestive system and the bowels, including soothing diarrhea
Viral infections, such as feline leukemia
Cancerous tissue
Failure of organs, such as kidneys or the liver
Autoimmune conditions
Pain
That last one may seem vague, but ozone is a highly effective pain relief and regardless of what might be upsetting your feline friend, ozone could at least improve their quality of life and help to bring down the pain for a few days. It’s always important to identify the source of the pain, but if it’s an accompaniment to other conditions, particularly in old age, then ozone is an ideal option for pain relief that doesn’t rely on drugs.

How to Give Subcutaneous Fluids to a Cat at Home Video IMG_7692
Caymus sitting for treatment of kidney disease.

Purchase an Ozone machine for cats (but make sure you have your ozone vet’s guidance)

How is it administered?

The condition of your cat will determine what success you can hope to achieve with ozone therapy, but it will also help determine the best way for your veterinarian to administer the therapy.
Unlike normal oxygen, ozone can’t be inhaled in its pure form. It can dry out tissue and cause damage. Instead, if it is to be absorbed through the lungs, it needs to be percolated through an oil, often olive oil. This makes it safe to breathe in, and can help tackle respiratory issues.
Ozonated oils can also be massaged into the skin or rubbed around wounded areas to allow the oxygen atoms to be absorbed. It’s safe around the eyes if your cat has an issue in a sensitive area. Ozone can also be added to an intravenous fluid that’s being fed into your cat’s bloodstream.
Infections of the kidney or liver, as well as conditions such as Lyme disease, can be effectively treated in this way. If the problem is gastrointestinal, then ozone may be infused rectally. Don’t worry, as your veterinarian will be experienced in suppository treatment for cats and can help to soothe your pet before and during therapy.
Ozone can also be direction injected into either joints where there is pain, or into tumors. If it’s a muscle or wound injury then that part of the body may be bagged to allow ozone to work as a gas, without the risk of your pet inhaling it.
Most ozone therapies are administered by a professional vet in a clinic environment such as an animal hospital. There are some options for at-home treatment – you’ll just need to purchase specialist equipment to help you. Check out these videos where I show you how to generate ozone and how to deliver it to your cat rectally.

What are the side effects of ozone therapy?

When used correctly, there are no side effects of ozone therapy. That’s one of the reasons why it’s becoming more popular as a way of treating various illnesses with cats. As ozone is simply made of oxygen, it is a purely natural gas that can help where drugs and other invasive treatments might not have been successful. Some of the ways of administering ozone therapy aren’t particularly pleasant. Often it is most effective for certain conditions when delivered rectally. This will likely cause your cat some minor discomfort for a few minutes both during and after the treatment, but take your time and use the correct procedures and they will be safe. Your cat will recover from this discomfort quickly, and you should only see the positive effects even by the time you’ve driven home, or within a short time if you’ve done it yourself. It’s a treatment I’ve carried out many times myself and can vouch for it. That couple of minutes of unpleasant treatment is more than worth it for the quality of life improvements, and your cat will be happier, more comfortable and more energetic thanks to the treatment. It is worth noting that, when used incorrectly and inhaled directly, ozone can cause serious health problems for your cat. They will suffer irritation at least, and at worst potentially lung damage. Ozone isn’t supposed to be inhaled when pure. Make sure that any treatment is carried out exactly as instructed, and if you’re using an ozone diffuser and are unsure, speak to your veterinarian for advice rather than guessing at any stage. Safety first is absolutely key when it comes to the health of your cat.

How to Give Subcutaneous Fluids to a Cat at Home Video fluid pouch IMG_7717
Caymus outside enjoying the fresh air.

Purchase an Ozone machine for cats (but make sure you have your ozone vet’s guidance)

How safe is ozone therapy?

Ozone therapy is still considered an alternative treatment, which simply means that some vets will opt for a more ‘conventional’ treatment option that is currently recommended, while ozone therapy is sometimes used instead of those options. That does not mean it isn’t safe. Ozone therapy is not something offered by shady back-alley companies but is a treatment widely offered by respected animal hospitals that cater for holistic treatments such as acupuncture. It’s not safe if it is done incorrectly – but that’s not about accidental errors, rather if someone chooses to use ozone inappropriately, such as if given as a pure inhalant. As long as you use a regulated, trustworthy animal hospital or veterinarian, or you follow the steps of an at-home ozone generator carefully, you can be comfortable that ozone therapy is safe for your cat. As you’ve seen if you’ve watched the video above, the steps are reasonable enough to follow, and the instructions are clear. Purchase an Ozone machine for cats (but make sure you have your ozone vet’s guidance)

How often should you do ozone therapy?

How frequently you give your cat ozone therapy will depend on the condition you’re trying to treat. Short-term issues will normally require somewhere between 6 and 10 treatments according to some vets, while more chronic long-term health problems might mean that you want to continue it for longer. It’s perfectly fine to take your cat for treatment more than once a week – it’s something I did with Caymus, going twice a week. You can watch this video all about Caymus’ experiences with ozone therapy, including the quick recovery time after rectal administration.

The benefits of using ozone can also help where you’re concerned about relying too much on antibiotics. If it’s an illness that ozone has shown signs of treating, you can speak to your vet about trying it and save the potency of antibiotics for when they’re needed more.

Over time you may want to reduce the number of sessions as you start to see an improvement in your cat’s condition, but you can always start again – the safe and natural method of using ozone means that you can comfortably return to it in future if your cat suffers other illnesses or starts feeling worse again.

Purchase an Ozone machine for cats (but make sure you have your ozone vet’s guidance) Ultimately, what’s right for your cat will depend on how long and how often you decide to use ozone therapy. Discuss your options with your cat’s vet, and they’ll help to create the best treatment plan to resolve your cat’s health problems and to make them a lot happier. Kidney Disease Related Reading: Kidney Disease in CatsTest for Kidney Disease in Your CatKidney Disease Cat Food

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares