Mink Ragdoll

Mink Cats are just darker versions of their lighter counterparts–like Blue, Lilac, Red, Seal , Solid , and Tortie.

collage of ragdoll color progression Theodore - seal mitted mink loved by Kristen 3 months 6 months 9 months 1 year 9 months
Theodore – seal mitted mink loved by Kristen. Photo clockwise shows: 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 1 year 9 months.

So, what is a Mink Ragdoll anyway?

Denali a Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll cat with a Blaze lying on a cat tree and also sitting on the carpet
Denali, a Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll cat with a Blaze
6 months to 18 months to 4 years
Photo Credit: Jerri K.

Minks are a particular type of Ragdoll cat. The term “Mink” does not refer to a color or a pattern. It is not a different breed, either. Instead, it refers to a bloodline that goes back all the way to the very first Ragdoll cats created by the first breeders of Ragdoll cats. They are purebred Ragdoll cats, as confirmed by SBT and TICA. While most breeders use traditional Ragdoll cats, a few breed traditional Ragdolls and minks.

collage progression pictures of a Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll from kitten to adult

KB, a Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll “One does not simply look this good on accident😼”

Mink Ragdoll Genetics

Among the very first Ragdoll cats from Ann Baker’s cattery, Raggedy Ann, there were cats like Josephine, a solid white Ragdoll, and Buckwheat, a black Burmese-type cat, both holding official pedigrees.

Blue Colorpoint Mink Ragdoll Cat Bella lying on blue carpet and head tilted to the side
Bella, a Blue Colorpoint Mink Ragdoll Cat at 6 years old. Loved by Dana

Burmese cats played a considerable role in the development of the Ragdoll breed, even at a genetic level. Burmese cats have the cb gene, which gives them their brownish coat, even though their general background features a black coat. The points – mask, ears, legs, and tail- are very dark, and the rest of the body is much lighter in tone. When Burmese cats were bred to create Ragdoll cats, the Mink bloodline presented a combination of genes called the Mink gene, which combines the pointed gene and the Burmese gene – cbcs.

Zeus chocolate colorpoint seal mink shown as a kitten and as an adult
Zeus, a Chocolate Colorpoint Seal Mink Ragdoll Cat
16 days to 6 years

When two Mink Ragdoll cats are bred, this is what the litter will look like: 50% will be Mink colored, 25% will be Sepia colored (this is actually the Burmese brown color, which is referred to as Sepia for Ragdolls), and 25% will be pointed traditional Ragdolls. Let’s see how this happens:

Mink Ragdoll cats Genetics chart

-Some kittens will get the cb gene from both parents, translating into the sepia color. Statistically, they will represent 25% of the litter. Some kittens will get the cs gene from both parents, translating into the pointed traditional variation. They are also 25% of the litter, according to genetic statistics.

Benny the Seal Mitted mink Ragdoll cat progression from kitten to adult. He's sitting on the countertop
“Beautiful, Big Benny!”
Benny, a Seal Mitted mink Ragdoll cat

– Some kittens will get the cb from one parent and the cs from the other, translating into the Mink color. They represent 50% of the litter, according to genetic statistics. Only half of the litter will be Mink when two Minks are bred, which adds to the challenge of developing this bloodline.

ragdoll color progression Lucy - Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll. Showing from kitten to adult.
Lucy – Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll loved by Amy

Another thing you should be aware of is that some breeders might tell you that their kittens are 1/2 Mink or 1/4 Mink, but genetically, that makes no sense. To be Mink Ragdolls, they must have the cbcs gene, and there is no halfway measure for this.

Each kitten in the abovementioned litter is 100% mink, 100% traditional, and 100% sepia. Just because they have Mink parents does not make Ragdoll cats minks necessarily. This is a tactic used by some breeders to increase the value of the cats they are selling.

Blueberry a blue mink ragdoll lying on a blue couch
Blueberry, a blue mink Ragdoll

What Does a Mink Ragdoll Look Like?

Mink Ragdolls got their name because the fur of this type of Ragdoll cat is much smoother than that of a traditional Ragdoll cat.

Honey is a seal mink-mitted ragdoll. Collage pictures of her sitting in various places
Honey is a seal mink mitted ragdoll loved by Debra Seglund, 6 months to 2.5 years.

This might be hard to imagine since Ragdolls are known worldwide for exceptionally smooth coats. Still, the feeling you get when you pet a Mink Ragdoll is of mink fur. Another notable difference is the eye color. While traditional Ragdoll cats have bright blue eyes, Mink Ragdolls have mesmerizing aqua eyes, combining blue and green coloring. Their eyes are the color of oceans.

This is my 2-year-old seal point mink, Amerirags Coco Mousse (Coco), showing his color progression from kitten to adult
2-year-old seal point mink Ragdoll Cat, Amerirags Coco Mousse (Coco) showing his color progression
12 weeks, 1 year, and current

Mink Ragdolls Colors and Patterns

Mink Ragdolls are easy to spot from day one, literally. While traditional Ragdolls are born with white fur all over their bodies, Minks are born with colored fur.

Seal Tabby Mink Ragdoll Cat showing color progression from kitten to adult
Minkerbell van Cats in Zen
Eur. Premior
Seal Tabby Mink Ragdoll Cat – 6 weeks and 3 years
(Admin note: outside the USA, “Lynx” is referred to as “Tabby” it is the same thing).

As for the color itself, this varies between the full range of Ragdoll colors – Seal, Blue, Lilac, Chocolate, Flame, Cream, and Tortie. They also display the full range of patterns – Colorpoint, Mitted, Bi-color, and Van.

Ragdoll Cat Blue Mitted Lynx Mink Napa at 5 months and 4 years old.
Napa at 5 months and 4 years old. He’s a Blue Mitted Lynx Mink. Loved by Lynn

However, there is a crucial difference from traditional Ragdoll cats. Even though Mink Ragdolls are the same colors, their colors are more robust, richer, and somewhat darker than those of traditional Ragdoll cats. Therefore, Minks are traditional Ragdoll cats in high contrast.

Leo Blue Bicolor Mink Ragdoll Cat sitting
“our boy Leo.”
Leo, Blue Bicolor Mink Ragdoll Cat

Mink Ragdoll Cat Temperament

Many people wonder if Mink Ragdolls have the well-reputed dog-like personality of Ragdoll cats. Thankfully, yes, they do. Their fur might be smoother to the touch and richer in contrast, and their eyes might be a different color. Still, their personality is just as floppy, friendly, and docile as all Ragdoll cats. This is the most important characteristic of Ragdoll cats and is undoubtedly present in Minks.

Bandit Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll showing his color progression from kitten to adult
Bandit, Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll (4 months to 3 years old) – Photo credit: Heather Wampler

Mink Ragdolls vs. Traditional Ragdolls

Theodore Roosevelt, a Mink seal mitted cat shown as a kitten and as an adult
Theodore Roosevelt, a Mink seal mitted 18lb boy, loved by Kristen

Aside from that, Minks have gorgeous aqua eyes, a luxurious combination of blue and green that reminds of the depth of the sea. Traditional Ragdolls have clear blue eyes. Another key difference is that Mink kittens are born with colored fur. This sets them apart from all the other Ragdoll cats, which are born white.

Pippen chocolate mink colorpoint Ragdoll Cat staring up into the camera
Pippen, chocolate mink colorpoint

What Mink Ragdolls and traditional Ragdolls have in common is a very diverse color spectrum and a wide variety of patterns. They also share the most charming personality in the feline world – the unique combination of social and floppy and their affinity for humans.

Murphy a Seal Lynx Colorpoint Mink Ragdoll Cat wearing a bow tie lying on the bed
Murphy, a Seal Lynx Colorpoint Mink Ragdoll Cat
4-5 months old to 2 years old
Photo Credit: Cassidy Westlund

Mink Ragdoll FAQ

Are mink ragdolls rare? Depends on who you talk to. Some say Minks are, and some say they aren’t. Minks come from a specific bloodline of Ragdoll cats that goes down to the first Ragdolls cats. Only half of the litter comprises Minks when two Minks are bred together. These cats are rare but have very high genetic value for the Ragdoll cat breed.

Fiona seal point mink ragdoll showing color progression at 12 weeks and 8 years,
Fiona, seal point mink ragdoll, at 12 weeks and 8 years, loved by Stacey and Jon

Do mink ragdolls shed? Yes, they do, just like any other Ragdoll cat. While their fur is thicker and smoother to the touch, Mink Ragdolls will shed. They still need to be groomed regularly to keep shedding down to a minimum. However, please note that Ragdolls do not shed a lot for cats with long coats. The shedding can be handled easily with proper care and continuous effort from the owners.

Luck Bea a Lady Seal Mink Ragdoll Cat showing color progression from kitten to adult
BigCityDolls Luck Bea a Lady
Seal Mink Ragdoll Cat
Photo Credit: Kristi Pemberton

Are Mink Ragdolls more expensive? Yes, they are more expensive than traditional Ragdoll cats because they come from a superior bloodline of the breed. This bloodline goes down to the very first Ragdoll cats ever bred by Ann Baker. This puts them in an entirely different league. In addition, mink Ragdolls present superior characteristics in coat smoothness and thickness, coloring, and eye color. Moreover, they are bred from a limited pool, with a 50% rate of Mink reproduction. All of these elements make Mink Ragdolls more expensive than other Ragdoll cats.

Blue Bicolor Mink Ragdoll Cat lying on mat staring at camera
“Why yes, I AM a princess!”
Mila, a Blue Bicolor Mink Ragdoll Cat
Photo Credit: Sonja Schlandt

Are Minks a different breed than Ragdolls? No, Minks are not a different breed. They are legitimate Ragdoll cats and direct descendants of the very first Ragdoll cats ever bred. This makes their bloodline extremely important for preserving the genetic pool of the Ragdoll breed. In addition, they display superior physical characteristics – they have a thicker and smoother coat and aqua eyes, and their kittens are born with colored fur.

Ragdoll cat Seal Mink Mitted Pickles shown as kitten and then as adult
Ragdoll cat Seal Mink Mitted Pickles loved by Virginia.

How can you tell a Mink Ragdoll apart from a traditional Ragdoll cat? The primary factor that can help you tell the difference between a Mink Ragdoll and a traditional Ragdoll cat is the color of the eyes. Minks have aqua eyes, a combination of blue and green, while traditional Ragdolls have full-on blue eyes. Then, it would help if you compared the softness and smoothness of the fur. Minks have much smoother fur than traditional Ragdoll cats, similar to mink fur.

Blue Mitted Mink with Blaze Ragdoll Cat color progression from kitten to adult
Arthas, a Blue Mitted Mink with Blaze Ragdoll Cat
12 weeks old to 1.5 years old
Photo Credit: Sasha Aaron

Can you have Ragdoll cats that are 1/2 Mink? No, you can’t. There are several variations within the Ragdoll breed, from a genetic standpoint. A cat can be considered a Mink Ragdoll only if the cat has the cbcs gene, in which case that cat is 100% Mink. A traditional Ragdoll cat from Mink Ragdoll parents has no higher genetic value than one from traditional Ragdoll parents.

Soba a Seal Point Mink Ragdoll Cat hanging off a cat tree
Soba, a Seal Point Mink Ragdoll Cat

Can you get traditional Ragdolls by breeding two Mink Ragdoll cats? Yes, you can. When two Mink Ragdoll cats are bred, both the parents possess the cbcs gene, which is specific for this bloodline. However, genetic statistics relay that this gene will only be transmitted as it is to 50% of the litter. 25% of the litter will have the genetic markings of a traditional Ragdoll cat – the cscs gene.

Dylan at 2 months and 2 years. Dylan is a seal mink mitted ragdoll.
Dylan at 2 months and 2 years. Dylan is a seal mink-mitted Ragdoll.

What color is a Mink Ragdoll? Mink Ragdoll cats are not restricted to a single color or pattern. The specific characteristics they possess refer to the thickness and smoothness of their fur and the color of their eyes. Therefore, mink Ragdolls can be of any Ragdoll-specific color – Blue, Seal, Chocolate, Lilac, Flame, Tortie, Cream – and patterns – Colorpoint, Van, Bi-color, and Mitted.

Do Mink Ragdolls have blue eyes? No, they usually do not. Mink Ragdolls usually have aqua eyes, a combination of blue and green. Some say that their eyes look like the Caribbean Sea. Some minks keep the blue eyes they are born with. Minks are the only variation to display this eye color, which sets them apart from the rest of the Ragdoll cats.

Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll Cat Louis as a kitten and then as an adult
Louis, a Seal Mitted Mink Ragdoll Cat
Photo Credit: Krista Janes

Can you tell the Mink Ragdoll cats in a litter? Yes, you can. While other variations of the breed might be more difficult to spot early on, Mink Ragdoll kittens have a unique characteristic – they are born with colored fur. In contrast, all the other Ragdoll cats are born with full white coats. This way, it is easier to spot the Minks in the litter.

Seal Mink Lynx Bicolor ragdoll cat with long bushy tail sitting in front of blue wall
Moira – Mink Seal Lynx Bicolor (Adult Female Ragdoll)
Photo Credit: Kristy Marson

Are Mink Ragdolls recognized as Ragdoll cats? Yes, they are. According to TICA ragdoll standards,  The International Cat Association (TICA) Mink Ragdolls are recognized as legitimate Ragdoll cats. Therefore, they are allowed to have pedigrees, are eligible for competitions, and can be presented in shows.

Are Mink Ragdolls friendly? Yes, they are. Mink Ragdolls have the same adorable personality as all Ragdoll cats. They are incredibly human-friendly, docile, easy-going, and floppy. This is the typical trait displayed by all the various types of Ragdoll cats, and it is the main reason for the breed’s enormous popularity.

Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll lying on couch
Bastien, Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll, age 4 1/2 years.
Bastien lying on couch
Bastien, Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll, age 4 1/2 years.
Rocky (Rockford), Seal Colorpoint Ragdoll, 4 1/2 years old
Rocky (Rockford), Seal Colorpoint Ragdoll, 4 1/2 years old
Rocky Seal Colorpoint Cat close up on his face
Rocky (Rockford), Seal Colorpoint Ragdoll, 4 1/2 years old

Are mink Ragdolls rare?

ragdoll color progression Lucy - Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll loved by Amy

Depends on who you talk to. Some say Minks are, and some say they aren’t. Minks come from a specific bloodline of Ragdoll cats that goes down to the first Ragdolls cats. Only half of the litter comprises Minks when two Minks are bred together. These cats are rare but have very high genetic value for the Ragdoll cat breed.

Do mink Ragdolls shed?

Blue Bicolor Mink Ragdoll Cat

Yes, they do, just like any other Ragdoll cat. While their fur is thicker and smoother to the touch, Mink Ragdolls will shed. They must still be groomed regularly to keep shedding down to a minimum. However, please note that Ragdolls do not shed much for cats with long coats. The shedding can be handled easily with proper care and continuous effort from the owners.

Are Mink Ragdolls more expensive?

Quincy Chocolate Mink Mitted Ragdoll Kitten of the Month IMG_7057

Yes, they are more expensive than traditional Ragdoll cats because they come from a superior bloodline of the breed. This bloodline goes down to the very first Ragdoll cats ever bred by Ann Baker. This puts them in an entirely different league. In addition, mink Ragdolls present superior characteristics in coat smoothness and thickness, coloring, and eye color. Moreover, they are bred from a limited pool, with a 50% rate of Mink reproduction. All of these elements make Mink Ragdolls more expensive than other Ragdoll cats.

Are Minks a different breed than Ragdolls?

Seal Tabby Mink Ragdoll Cat Minkerbell van Cats in Zen

No, Minks are not a different breed. They are legitimate Ragdoll cats and direct descendants of the very first Ragdoll cats ever bred. This makes their bloodline extremely important for preserving the genetic pool of the Ragdoll breed. In addition, they display superior physical characteristics – they have a thicker and smoother coat and aqua eyes, and their kittens are born with colored fur.

How can you tell a Mink Ragdoll apart from a traditional Ragdoll cat?

Theodore Roosevelt, a Mink seal mitted 18lb boy, loved by Kristen

The primary factor that can help you tell the difference between a Mink Ragdoll and a traditional Ragdoll cat is the color of the eyes. Minks have aqua eyes, a combination of blue and green, while traditional Ragdolls have full-on blue eyes. Then, it would help if you compared the softness and smoothness of the fur. Minks have much smoother fur than traditional Ragdoll cats, similar to mink fur.

Can you have Ragdoll cats that are 1/2 Mink?

Zeus chocolate colorpoint seal mink

No, you can’t. There are several variations within the Ragdoll breed from a genetic standpoint. A cat can be considered a Mink Ragdoll only if the cat has the cbcs gene, in which case that cat is 100% Mink. A traditional Ragdoll cat from Mink Ragdoll parents has no higher genetic value than one from traditional Ragdoll parents.

Can you get traditional Ragdolls by breeding two Mink Ragdoll cats?

Leo Blue Bicolor Mink Ragdoll Cat

Yes, you can. When two Mink Ragdoll cats are bred, both the parents possess the cbcs gene, which is specific for this bloodline. However, genetic statistics relay that this gene will only be transmitted as it is to 50% of the litter. 25% of the litter will have the genetic markings of a traditional Ragdoll cat – the cscs gene.

What color is a Mink Ragdoll?

Ragdoll cat Seal Mink Mitted Pickles loved by Virginia

Mink Ragdoll cats are not restricted to a single color or pattern. Their specific characteristics refer to the thickness and smoothness of their fur and the color of their eyes. Therefore, mink Ragdolls can be of any Ragdoll-specific color – Blue, Seal, Chocolate, Lilac, Flame, Tortie, Cream – and patterns – Colorpoint, Van, Bi-color, and Mitted.

Can you tell the Mink Ragdoll cats in a litter?

Fiona seal point mink ragdoll at 12 weeks and 8 years, loved by Stacey and Jon IMG_20190121_084054

Yes, you can. While other variations of the breed might be more difficult to spot early on, Mink Ragdoll kittens have a unique characteristic – they are born with colored fur. In contrast, all the other Ragdoll cats are born with full white coats. This way, it is easier to spot the Minks in the litter.

Are Mink Ragdolls recognized as Ragdoll cats?

Seal Mink Mitted Ragdoll

Yes, they are. According to TICA ragdoll standards,  The International Cat Association (TICA) Mink Ragdolls are recognized as legitimate Ragdoll cats. Therefore, they are allowed to have pedigrees, are eligible for competitions, and can be presented in shows.

Are Mink Ragdolls friendly?

Katniss - a Mink Mitted Bi-Color Seal Point Ragdoll Cat

Yes, they are. Mink Ragdolls have the same adorable personality as all Ragdoll cats. They are incredibly human-friendly, docile, easy-going, and floppy. This is the typical trait displayed by all the various types of Ragdoll cats, and it is the main reason for the breed’s enormous popularity.

Please contact floppycats.com if you have a Ragdoll kitty with this color type and would like for them to be featured on this page! Would you like to see more Ragdoll cat pics? Click on any of the color patterns below to see more:

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Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

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15 Comments

  1. Grizzilla says:

    Find an ethical, reputable and honest breeder who breeds to the Ragdoll written standard (blue eyed and pointed) if you’re interested in getting a purebred Ragdoll kitten. Otherwise, adopt from a shelter and save a homeless cat’s life. It’s really that simple.

  2. Hi Jen, Looking for a kitten like Coco or Blueberry on your page. I want a mink or sepia colored kitten. Having a hard time finding one near Augusta, GA. Do you happen to know of any breeders in my area that might have a kitten like this. Thanks so much!! Lee Anne

    1. You’ll need to email me, please. I can send you a list of reader recommended breeders – but not sure if Mink breeders will be on there.

  3. Hello. A friend who breeds Ragdolls told me about a litter, several years ago, that produced a mink seal point kitten. I have seen the photos and you can definitely see the kitten is coloured at birth. How often would a mink kitten appear in a traditional litter? And would this mean both parent had the mink gene?

  4. A Responsible Ragdoll Owner That Wishes To Correct False Info says:

    The comment from Ragdoll Lover Worldwide is correct. This post is HIGHLY misleading, and it is very irresponsible of a blogger with such an influence to write such a bad article.

    Ragdoll breed standards exist to establish, maintain, and better the breed. I am not sure why this post is so intent on supporting cats that do not meet the Ragdoll standard that the original breeder, Ann Baker, and multiple international cat associations have established – even going as far as to say that Mink Ragdolls have a superior bloodline? Why does no association allow them to be shown then, if they are such a better, superior line of Ragdolls? They are more uncommon because responsible breeders, who wish to better the breed, actually follow the breed standard, which does NOT recognize them and does not allow them into cat shows. If they were truly superior and a better version of the breed, you think they’d be accepted into the breed standard and more breeders would have them to better the breed. Minks are more expensive because they are falsely marketed as rare, creating consumer demand as Ragdoll Lover Worldwide stated.

    If you are going to “shop” for a cat as expensive as a Ragdoll instead of adopting, please do your research and go to a REPUTABLE, ETHICAL breeder who FOLLOWS the breed standard and wishes to BETTER the breed. I don’t want to be that person as I have a Ragdoll of my own, but there are so many strays, animal shelters are always full, and so many cats are euthanized every year – according to ASPCA, over 800,000 cats are euthanized every year in the US. I understand that it is very difficult and competitive to find a real Ragdoll to adopt, and that your love for them is too great that you would rather buy one from a breeder than adopt a stray cat – I feel the exact same way! But we must be responsible and do our part.

    Reputable breeders do not contribute to the stray and animal overpopulation problem. They breed out of their love for the breed, to share the happiness they feel from Ragdolls with other families, and seek to better the breed and follow the standards. They are not in it for the money, and it’s not even really profitable for them unless they’re a backyard breeder/kitten factory. They do not contribute to the stray problem because they make sure to spay/neuter every pet kitten before it leaves their home to prevent unintentional/unregulated breeding, which adds to the stray problem. More often than not, they will also say in the kitten contract that in the case you are no longer able to care for your Ragdoll, they will take it back and care for it themselves or find a good home for it for you. They do not let their Ragdolls go into shelters, therefore not adding to the problem.

    If you’re going to spend thousands of dollars to buy a cat rather than adopt, go to a breeder that does not add to the stray/shelter problem. Go to a breeder that seeks to better the breed, not one that seeks to pump out “rare” kittens for money like elves making presents in Santa’s Workshop. Ask for health and genetic testing papers and pedigrees of both of the parents. Go to a breeder has done or still does cat shows, as they follow the breed standard. You’re spending big bucks to specifically get a Ragdoll, right? So make sure you’re getting one with BLUE EYES and that’s NOT MINK OR SEPIA, with official pedigree papers. Otherwise, you’re basically getting a random moggy (cat-version of mutt) with who-knows-what origins, and if that’s the case you might as well just adopt one from a shelter that has the look you want. That way you save money and save a life. Boom, two birds with one stone.

    It just makes me sad to see so many people get scammed or spend so much money on a cat that’s not even a real Ragdoll, which provides money and demand to backyard breeders. Please, if you’re going to buy a cat, please be responsible. Get a pointed, blue-eyed, non-mink/sepia Ragdoll, and don’t listen to this post as if it were factually correct. 🙂

    1. For information, the colorpoint causes a visual defect. Do you like blue eyes, so you like to maintain a visual deficit and cross-eyed cats? That is. Me, I like cats that see clearly, so to improve the breed, I prefer to do mink. Follow the precepts of sclerotic and backward instances if you will, the same ones that let breeders shake cats’ tails to swell their coats at shows, but breeders are still free to have brains and ethics to care more about animal health and welfare than eye color!

  5. I have to disagree with this post. It is entirely misleading and based on biased opinions and speculation. As a popular Ragdoll blogger, I urge you to do more research and write about the topic of minks from a neutral perspective so as to not mislead the public.

    “While most breeders use traditional Ragdoll cats, there are a few others who breed using Minks. This is one of the reasons why Mink Ragdolls are so rare.”

    Mink Ragdolls are “rare” because most Ragdoll breeders are working with official Ragdoll breed standards. These standards are put together by a panel through hardwork, planning, cooperating efforts with other Ragdoll enthusiasts, and collectively becomes the ‘definition’ of the cat breed. Breeders thereafter should strive to breed to standard and not stray from the definition of that particular cat breed just because they want to produce some “rare colors” based on consumer demand. The integrity of breeding should not be based on consumer demand, it’s foundation is built on furthering the goals of maintaining and improving the breed.

    “Among the very first Ragdoll cats ever, from Ann Baker’s cattery, Raggedy Ann, there were cats like Josephine, which was a solid white Ragdoll, and Buckwheat, which was a black Burmese-type cat, both holding official pedigrees.”

    The Ragdolls are a man-made created breed. Ann Baker bred a bunch of stray cats together in order to create the Ragdoll breed. That should not be confused with her goals. The goal was not to keep the look / lines of the stray cats. The goal was to selectively breed the best temperaments, isolate the color / pattern genomes, and develop and improve the Ragdoll breed.

    “Mink Ragdolls are a superior bloodline of Ragdoll cat, but what do they actually look like? What makes them superior, anyway? They got their name because the fur of this type of Ragdoll cat is much smoother than that of a traditional Ragdoll cat.”

    Mink Ragdolls are NOT a superior bloodline, and this is entirely misleading if it is stated as a fact. But if this is your opinion, it should be clear to your viewers that it’s your opinion, and not a commonly shared fact. If they were a superior bloodline, why are they not written into the registry standards? Why has TICA and CFA refused to write “mink” into the Ragdoll breed standards they published? TICA allows them to be registered. But of course, all you need is one parent to be a Ragdoll to register a kitten under the breed “Ragdoll.” CFA does not recognize them at all, they are not permitted to be registered or shown in CFA.

    “Another notable difference is the eye color. While traditional Ragdoll cats have bright blue eyes, Mink Ragdolls have mesmerizing aqua eyes, which are a combination of blue and green coloring. Their eyes are the color of oceans.”

    Ragdolls are a blue eyed pointed breed, plain and simple. This is what they are known for, and this is one of the traits they they should be bred for.

    “To sum up the differences between Mink Ragdolls and traditional Ragdolls, it should be pointed out that Minks are a superior bloodline and that they are rare.”

    I disagree with both for the reasons stated above. I also think you should research and look into what a traditional Ragdoll is. A traditional Ragdoll is not a “non-mink” Ragdoll. A traditional Ragdoll is one that has absolutely no outcrosses, with its ancestors traceable to the foundation cats. Non-traditional Ragdolls include the accepted outcrosses: lynx, tortie, torbie, reds, creams, etc. Mink Ragdolls are it’s own category. They do not have superior bloodlines and they are only rare in the essence of breeders breeding to standard properly. Everything we as humans do, we do to learn from and improve upon. We don’t get stuck at the inception and refuse to improve.

    “[Minks are rare.] Only some breeders get to use cats from this bloodline in their catteries.”

    On the contrary. Superior Ragdoll bloodlines from reputable breeders breeding to standard are rare, and only some breeders get to use cats from THOSE bloodlines in their catteries. Mink breeders have a notable reputation of selling breeding rights to any person who is willing to pay top dollar for them.

    “[Mink ragdolls are more expensive] than traditional Ragdoll cats because they come from a superior bloodline of the breed.”

    I disagree. Mink Ragdolls are expensive because they are bred based on consumer demand. Because the majority of other breeders refuse to work with mink lines because it does not conform to standard, this provides an opportunity for Mink breeders to re-define themselves as “rare breeders breeding rare bloodlines” which is largely misleading.

    “This bloodline goes down to the very first Ragdoll cats ever bred by Ann Baker, which puts them in an entirely different league.”

    And it was never a part of Ann Baker’s goals. Her goals was to create a blue-eyed pointed breed. The “Ragdoll” name is attributed and connected to her name. If someone wanted to preserve this other variation, they should’ve created their own breed for those mink cats, not piggy-backed on the reputation of the Ragdoll breed. As you said “an entirely different league,” so they should’ve created their own breed.

    “Are Mink Ragdolls recognized as Ragdoll cats? Yes they are.”

    I disagree with how this worded. They are NOT recognized as Ragdoll cats universally. In between the two largest cat registries in the U.S., they are only recognized for registration in TICA. It should be further clarified that they are NOT eligible for competitions in shows as your blog says, they are only eligible for competitions in shows as an EXPERIMENTAL breed.

    I’ve been a long-time supporter of your blog and social media. But after this, I’m very disappointed in how misleading, uninformed, and biased this blog post is. Do you even have a Mink Ragdoll to be biasly promoting them now??

  6. Can anyone speak to the controversy around Minks? I recently bought from a breeder who has in the past bred mink ragdolls, but online there seems to be a backlash against recognizing this color, or breeders who use this color.

    This does not change my mind about the breeder, as out of every cattery we researched, they were the most thorough, transparent and it was clear the cats were well kept and healthy. I am just wondering what everyone thinks of this “Ragdoll color purity” topic…

  7. Melissa Mclean says:

    Hey Jenny! Your timing on this one couldn’t have been more perfect! We will be welcoming our new fur ball in a few weeks! He’s a blue bicolor mink rag.
    And interestingly, our girl, a flamepoint – has the eyes of a mink and the softest fur ever. I just had nothing to compare to, since she is our first rag. But after reading your article, it’s all coming together that she is likely a mink too. so thanks!

  8. So glad you re-posted this one, Jenny! LURVE the minks soooo very much! So much beautiful darkness! Yummy!! 🙂 <3

    Big hugs & lots of love!!

    Patti & Miss Pink Sugarbelle 🙂 <3

  9. I would love to upload a pics of my beautiful mink babies but its not on here how to do so. This is second time ive tried! help 🙂

    1. Tamara,

      Unfortunately, you cannot load photos onto the site – I have to do it.

      If you are thinking of submitting them as Ragdoll of the Week, then you will need to send me their stories and photos all in one email to info [at] floppycats.com.

      Thanks,
      Jenny

  10. Hi there, having looked at your website I decided you might be the best person to advise me what colour ragdoll kitten I have bought.

    Her coat is the colour of fudge, this colour of fudge is over most of her body. She is a bi point with booties.

    I was told she is lilac but having looked on webistes they look to be very white with a tint of grey.

    Is she possibly a MINK???.

    Thank you for your time ,

    madi

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