What Are Your Ragdoll Cat Questions?

| December 14, 2012 | 37 Comments
Murphy on Tuckers Paw

Murphy on Tuckers Paw

We are emailed all the time with Ragdoll cat questions – whether it’s about Ragdoll cat behavioral issues or about the kind of cat food Charlie and Trigg eat, they are always coming in – and I love it!  I love to learn, so the questions help me learn as well.

Many times, when someone asks me something that I cannot immediately answer, I like to go to Facebook and ask for reader advice – and we get the best suggestions!  The only thing that bothers me about Facebook is that the posts seem to disappear, so I want to try and address issues on the blog, so that they can be used in the future – like Cat Pooping Outside of the Litter Box.

I want to know what your Ragdoll cat questions are – do you have question or some other inquiry related to your kitty?  Please post the question below in the comments and let’s start getting to the bottom of it!  Or you can send me photos and the question to me via email and we’ll get it on the site!  Of course, if you’d like to remain anonymous – that’s OK too.  Just let me know.

Also, if you have a question, you can always post it on our Facebook page (be sure to include a photo of your kitty, Facebook only allows me to share as “Floppycats” when there is a photo) or you can also ask in our active Ragdoll cat forum.

 

Print Friendly

Tags: , ,

Category: Ragdoll Cat Behavior

You may also like:

About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (37)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. El says:

    I’d love to know if there is any rough guide on how much a male Ragdoll should weigh monthly in their growing years, specifically the first growing year. Any questions pertaining to growth would be useful!

  2. Kim says:

    Do you know about what age a ragdoll is considered full grown?

  3. Cindy says:

    I’d love advice on how much to feed a growing ragdoll. Our little guy’s parents are 20 and 22 pounds respectively, so the information on the back for “regular”cats isn’t cutting it!
    Also, how to best integrate two ragdoll kittens who are five months apart.
    Thank you!

  4. Karen says:

    Our little imp, who is now an almost 3 year old male Ragdoll is still not too interested in being petted and will often bite (not hard drawing blood) but too hard/uncomfortable. He will sometimes use his claws/scratch as well and hasn’t seemed to learn about not being too rough to the hand that feeds him/loves him/plays with him. Any suggestions on how to handle too rough when playing, which we believe it to be over truely being malicious. Thanks!

  5. Michelle says:

    I dont really agree that he is bored or that ragdolls are active , mine are the laziest sods around.
    my 5 yr old female ragdoll can be fiesty and has a attitude. she snaps sometimes and thats just her. No matter how many times i say no or ouch. learn when your cat is not in the mood to be petted and if she bites during play then use strong toys ! they can be trained to a degree , but their temprement won’t change.

  6. Michelle says:

    my 5 yr old female ragdoll can be fiesty and has a attitude. she snaps sometimes and thats just her. No matter how many times i say no or ouch. learn when your cat is not in the mood to be petted and if she bites during play then use strong toys ! they can be trained to a degree , but I don’t think their temprement will change. My other ragdoll is her sister , and she’s a very gentle girl. She never bites or plays rough and gets bossed around by her older sister all the time!

  7. william beadle says:

    question-i have a four year old female blue/siver, last night she got a funny look on her face and fell over, i picked her up and in a few minutes she was back to her happy self. I have a appointment with a vet today. Has anyone ever heaard of this?

    • Briael says:

      Could be lots of things:-

      1. low blood sugar if the kitty hasn’t eaten for a long time
      2. a neurological issue that is just starting to show
      3. a blood clot that passed
      4. epilepsy

      Your vet will do tests and try to identify what happened, but it may never happen again. If it does, all the above conditions can be managed between vet and human parent, so try not to worry until you know more.

      Good luck. 🙂

  8. sallyb says:

    Dear Jenny,
    I have an 8 week old ragdoll kitty who has been with me for just a few days. When he plays, he bites my hand or arm. Is this typical kitten behavior? How do I stop it?

    • Linda says:

      You should try to use only toys with your baby when you play. If you use your hands he will think that it is a toy and you will have forever created the hand biting issue. Also that is a very young kitten to be living away from its Mither, he is probably transitioning from nursing and may still be teething.

    • Jo Ann Hanstrom says:

      I had a gorgeous, sweet-natured, extremely smart Ragdoll who was accidentally killed when he was 18 months old. He was an ‘only’ and bit from the time he was a kitten. He did it even when scolded and he knew it was going to get him in trouble, sort of a compulsion, I guess. He bit HARD, drawing blood and leaving bruises on my hands and arms. He didn’t do it to my husband, just me, but he was thoroughly bonded with me and I think it was a ‘love’ thing because he was by my side every minute I was home. We now have two females, 10 months old, loving and smart, but they don’t bite. They’re really bonded with each other and play all the time. I think the difference is they have each other, not sure though. Bottom line, Rocky bit from the time we brought him home at 8 weeks until he died at 18 months. I still mourn him because he was such a gem, but I’m relieved that ‘the girls’ don’t bite.

  9. Fran says:

    Hi Sally,
    Yes, kittens can bite. They are used to playing with their littermates and use your hands and arms to substitute. Give him a toy to play with, but not immediately after he bites. (That would reward the behavior.) The best thing I know to do is just to remove yourself from the kitten. When you do, that sends the signal that his actions are not appropriate. After some time (does anyone know how long a ragdoll’s attention span is?) you can give him the toy to encourage him to play with that instead. Learn his patterns and pet him when he is not likely to bite. You will soon learn his daily patterns. Some are most calm after feeding. Some before bedtime.

  10. Cindy Bryant says:

    My female kitten bit also sometimes during petting or grooming. She just is imitating play with her litter mates. She is very young to be away from her momma….breeders usually do not release a Ragdoll kitten until they are 12 weeks as they are not fully socialized. Use a toy or teaser wand when playing….never your hands. I read about this method and worked surprising well with my little biter. Immediately after she bites…carefully place your thumb in her mouth and gently press down on their tongue and say firmly “NO BITE”. After repeating this process every time she bit me….by the 4th time she stopped. Every once in while she will bite….I repeat the process and she stops. Enjoy your Ragdoll kitten…I have had 3 and love the breed,

  11. Hailey says:

    My 6yr old male just started peeing on my couch. He does it in between the cushions. I can’t figure out why he is doing this or how to make him stop. Is this typical in a ragdoll? Thanks.

    • Jenny says:

      I would suggest reading the suggestions on Cat Peeing Outside of the Litter Box.

      No, it is not a typical Ragdoll – it can be a cat issue.

    • Briael says:

      Vet visit is the first thing you need, to rule out any bladder, kidney or urinary tract infections.

      Secondly, you’ll want to get an enzyme based cleaner to make sure all traces of the scent is removed from anywhere he’s peed already. Cats are attracted to “pee spots” and will continually return there unless you redirect it.

      Maybe he’s unhappy with the litter .. have you noticed any sneezing, or pawing at the tray without using it? Has he done any business in the tray? Sometimes a cat feels vulnerable and there are optimal positions to play trays in. Try moving it around and seeing if he likes it. Is the tray big enough for him to get in, turn around, not stand in his “business” and deep enough for him to be able to bury it? Cats are pretty fussy about hygiene so rule out the important issues first (health) then start looking for alternatives.

      Good luck. I know how distressing it is when a cat suddenly decides he isn’t toilet happy anymore.

  12. jane kelley says:

    I got a ragdoll kitten, she is 6 months old, and ready to be spayed, but she feels like such a light weight (My scales are broke) anyway I am worried that she is not gaining enought weight, I can still feel her little bones, even though she eats pretty good (Not a piggy) and plays alot.

    • Briael says:

      Much of the weight gain in kittens is based around the type of food you feed. Do you feed wet or dry? Grain free or regular? Do you supplement with raw meat and organs? Do you buy a kitten food or a cat food? Do you give high-fat treats?

      Read the labels on your cat food and do a little research on what nutrients you are actually giving. Many underweight cats are getting empty calories from carbohydrates that their bodies cannot absorb (they have a short digestive tract to reduce bacterial overload from what should be a meat heavy diet). Cats are obligate carnivores and need very high levels of protein for maximum health.

      A raw (alternatively named species appropriate) diet is probably the best thing you could do for your little carnivore, but it’s not practical unless you have the time to donate to preparing it fresh and freezing/de-frosting properly. This is why many of the upper end pet foods are now offering higher grade foods, which are largely meat, meat and more meat. Grain-free foods are recommended.

      When a label says meal, it is a ground down version of meat that can contain any part of the animal (beaks, hooves etc) and these offer little to no benefit to our fluffies. 🙂

  13. Jennifer Dixon says:

    I adopted a Ragdoll male kitten at nine weeks. He is precious and I spoil him rotten. He is now four months old and is constantly biting and scratching me; he even leaped at my face the other evening and scratched me. I was so angry; I literally shoved him hard off my bed and repeatedly said NO; he really became agitated and appeared ready to pounce once again. What can I do? Every time I pet him, he starts biting me. Sometimes I just want to give up and lock him in a room.

    • Smith PA says:

      At 4 months old, he is getting comfortable with his new home and this may just be rowdy kitten behavior. They all go through a biting stage because they are young and that is the only way they have learned to communicate. It isn’t something that you want to encourage though. It is understandable that you were frightened and angry and shoved him HOWEVER, you need to resist that urge and instead use your firm voice to tell him NO or EASY…EVERY time he begins to nip or scratch. At the same time, you need to immediately stop physically touching him and back off so that he can get his friskiness under control. Withholding interaction while he misbehaves will also reinforce that naughty behavior stops the fun. Fixing this takes time and the behavior won’t extinguish overnight, but with consistency and firmness they outgrow this stage and learn other ways to communicate.

      Also, keep his nails trimmed well and even consider temporarily using “Soft-Paws” if the clawing is bad during this training period. Never show anger or touch in an angry way…cats are very astute and this will only hurt any progress you have made and make him distrust you.

      This advice assumes that you have ruled out any medical issues that may also cause that behavior. You might consider a vet visit to rule out any UTI’s (males are very susceptible, especially if not eating a wet only diet) or any problems that may be causing pain that leads to him acting out.

      Hope this is helpful and hang in there!

    • erinnross says:

      Sounds like he needs some play time that will get his heart rate up and get him moving, climbing, and jumping around. Think about what will give him a cardio/aerobic workout. Ours is about 15 weeks old now, and he will play hard for more than an hour at a time, and it’s 100% worth the time invested now to help him bond to us, learn house rules, and further develop his personality as our companion.

    • Kim77 says:

      We have a male Ragdoll who is just now 6 months. Adopted at 9 weeks. You don’t say if this is your only cat, or first cat so I’ll just give a couple of suggestions. A few things come to mind when I read your post. First, it is possible that he is teething. Our boy got very nippy before his adult teeth came in. Second, it is possible that he needs more playtime with you before bed. I assume that you were in bed for the night when he pounced at you? Our kitten just won’t let us go to sleep unless we exhaust him with play before bed, then he gets his final meal of the day, then we go straight to bed. Unless something else is going on with your kitty, sounds like he doesn’t know that hands and feet (and faces!) are not acceptable for play. Try having a toy nearby wherever you are so that when he goes for you, you can give him the toy instead. Cats do not respond to “no” or physical punishments. Only positive reinforcements and deterrents will change their behaviour. In fact, you can make the kitten’s anxiety far worse by raising your voice and physically punishing them. My final suggestion may sound silly, but have you tried asking him if you can pet him first? I will just hold my hand out in a relaxed position for our kitten to sniff and let me know if he wants to be petted by rubbing his head into my hand. Your little guy needs some time to learn. Maybe he needs a vet checkup too, if his behaviour seems unusually aggressive? Hope some of this helps!

    • furlover says:

      From Tammy Elaine Hoeck He’s trying to tell you something. Cat’s don’t realize that they are hurting you because that is how they played with their siblings, when my cat started to bite me when we were playing I would just say “Oww” and then I could stop playing with him. He learned pretty quick that it was not acceptable behavior. But when you throw him off the bed like that he will just learn to fear you and will become aggressive, Try trying to divert his attention when he starts to play rough. Don’t give up on him, once he learns what is the correct behavior you will have YEARS of enjoying the company of your precious little guy.

  14. Briael says:

    Contrary to popular opinion, ragdolls aren’t docile at all. At least, not when they are under 3 years old. Because they are slower maturing cats the kitten years last a little longer.

    It sounds like your little one isn’t getting enough play time to wear out the energy level he has.

    Take a look at https://www.friskies.com/friskies-post/6-easy-cat-toys-that-you-can-make-at-home

    Half an hour with a laser pointer, a toy wand with a feather on the end, a ball that you sit and throw for them or anything that rustles or moves should do the trick. If he is disturbing you at bedtime, make sure you allow an hour or so to get him fed and played with so he understands that bedtime is when he needs to rest and let you do the same. 🙂

    Please don’t make the mistake of thinking he won’t tear around the house in the early hours, just like every other four pawed miaowing maniac! LOL

  15. Briael says:

    Oh, and I meant to mention that no ragdoll should be away from it’s mother or siblings before 12 weeks. Between 8 and 12 weeks is when they develop “manners” about scratching and biting, learned by playing with their siblings and how much claws and teeth can hurt.

    It sounds like your little fella is under-socialised. Have you considered getting a second one of similar age? Two are not more expensive than one, and it offers many bonuses: company during the day if you are out, someone to snuggle with at sleepytime, constant entertainment as they are the same/similar age and, perhaps most importantly, if you ever have to board them it will be less stressful to be boarded as a bonded pair.

    Please don’t ever play with a kitten with bare hands. It teaches them that hands are toys, and that doesn’t help them learn what is for play and what is for love. 🙂

  16. furlover says:

    A few people replied on FB. I will try to copy and paste here in the replies. My one year old fur baby still bites a little bit when he plays. Then he starts grooming me. And yes, he did bite my face once or twice while snuggling. Not fun at all. I do believe it is because I was not giving him enough exercise during the day. He is much better now, with consistency and affection. You must remember, they are used to playing with their siblings. I believe having fur helps them not feel the bites, they do not realize they are hurting us. My fur baby has never broken skin, so that I am very happy about. And he absolutely does not know what his claws are for, thank god! Never scratched. I do trim his nails at least once a month.

  17. furlover says:

    From Amanda Raymond Bergeron He wants to play. He isn’t getting the exercise needed to break through the high energy levels that kittens have.

    Half an hour with a laser pointer, a toy wand with a feather on the end, a ball that you sit and throw for them or take a look at:- https://www.friskies.com/…/6-easy-cat-toys-that-you-can…

    Ragdolls are not docile cats. They have the same range of emotional needs as any other cat, they are simply a little more cuddly than most moggies when picked up. Please don’t make the mistake of thinking they won’t tear around the house in the early hours, just like every other four pawed miaowing maniac.

    6 Easy Cat Toys that You Can Make at Home – Friskies® Post Blog
    http://www.friskies.com
    Get 6 easy ideas for creating DIY cat toys at home using simple everyday supplies.

  18. sheldynx says:

    Hi,

    I’ve got a 16 month old rag doll male, desexed.

    I’ve read a lot about rag dolls and have seen that they should be exclusively long haired.

    I got him from a breeder with many years experience but cheaper because I didn’t want papers.

    I had him vet checked and got all his results before purchasing so I’m sure he’s purebred however, he has long hair all over except his shoulders?!

    It seems weird but I’m wondering if its no big deal? He has the typical rag doll “mane” but below that he has really short hair and then it goes super long again… He’s been like that since I got him at 12 weeks.

    He also meows so much. But not just meows its like he copies whatever I’m saying. I know that sounds weird but he does all these noises my friends/family say they’ve never heard a cat do! He almost chirps sometimes. haha.

    He seems a healthy weight from what I’ve read on here but maybe a bit of a slow grower (I don’t restrict his food so there should be no reason)

    Do you think its all normal? I want him to have the best life so just wanting to check in & get some advice 🙂

    Thanks

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.