Top 5 Mistakes Cat Breeders Make with People Adopting Their Cats

| September 24, 2014 | 3 Comments

Charlie Seal Mitted Ragdoll Kitten with a Blaze Copyright FloppycatsI get a lot of emails. And one of the emails I most frequently get is how unresponsive breeders are to potential adoptees or even adoptees that have put a deposit down on their kitty. These are huge mistakes in customer service and marketing.  As a result, I thought it might be a good brainstorming session to put together a post about the top 5 mistakes cat breeders make with people adopting their cats.  However, this could also be true for a rescue or shelter too.

  1. Not Responding to Emails within 48 Hrs (Business Days) – Customer service is one of the essential elements to a long lasting business, especially when it comes to referrals.  I can’t tell you how many e-mails I get from people getting ready to adopt a kitten who are so frustrated that the breeder is not responding.
  2. Not Taking and Sharing Photos on a weekly or more frequent basis – Adoptees are soooo excited about their new baby and this excitement will carry on to their social media, Facebook, Instagram, etc.  Which will probably only result in additional referrals.  Heck, you could always post update photos on your cattery Facebook and send the potential adopter a link. That way, the potential adopter likes your page, likes the post on your page and then more than likely shares it, resulting in a potentially viral post for you.
  3. Not Taking and Sharing Videos – Videos are like business gold for a breeder’s marketing. You should have a YouTube channel and load them there.  That way you have exposure to a larger audience, almost immediately and you will also have a dedicated link to a video that can easily be shared.  If you don’t have a YouTube channel, at least add videos to your cattery’s Facebook page so they will be shared.
  4. Not Staying in Touch after the Sale – With today’s technology it is so very easy to stay in touch after the sale. Start a newsletter and ask the adopter if s/he wants to sign up for it and then check in on them every 6 months.  Why?  Again, marketing and referrals as well as reoccurring sales.  Many cat owners consider adopting another cat and if they have had a nice experience with their breeder, they will return.  Staying in touch after the adoption, also allows you as a breeder to ask for testimonials and referrals.
  5. Not Having a Running List of Recommended Products – I am often emailed by new kitten owners wondering what products to get for various things – beds, scratchers, etc.  While I do cover all those things and more in A Ragdoll Kitten Care Guide, I think breeders would benefit tremendously by keeping an ongoing list of products they like to use that they know are tried and true.  There’s an opportunity for breeders to get revenue from the referral – not costing the adoptee any more, but benefiting the breeder’s concise list.

Before publishing this post, I announced it’s upcoming debut on Facebook and asked readers what they thought the top 5 mistakes were.  Read the Top 5 Mistakes Cat Breeders Make with People Adopting Their Cats according to Floppycats’ readers.

I can’t tell you how many people have asked if I will breed or have said they wished I was a breeder.  I could never breed.  Never…and part of the reason is all the work involved.  I would feel obligated to execute the 5 things above and then some as well as make sure the kittens were healthy, safe, clean, etc.  It would be a tremendous amount of work.  I can understand how/why breeding is a lot of work, especially if you are in it for the love of the breed and not necessarily the money.  However, I do think, too, it’s a business (and a HUGE moral one at that) and it’s necessary to operate like one.

What do you think the top 5 mistakes are? In other words, during the process of adopting your kitty, was there anything you think your kitty’s breeder could have handled better or done better?

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Category: Ragdoll Breeders

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (3)

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  1. Patti Johnson says:

    Great post, Jenny! I really agree with everything you posted, too. I don’t have any complaints about Little Apple Ragdolls (where we got our Miss Pink Sugarbelle). Andrea made it a great experience for us. We got lucky in finding her and her cattery.

    Big hugs!

    Patti & Pink Sugar 🙂 <3

  2. Milos-mama says:

    The biggest error by breeders, books & blogs is that Ragdolls don’t shed! Wrong! Another tip which would have helped us is to go through your Ragdoll’s fur regularly & check for knots! We were grooming the top but ignored the belly, armpit & groin area which ended up being loaded with them. Fortunately, my husband is retired & he stayed on them daily plus several of them were so large, we had to CAREFULLY cut them out. When I say carefully, I mean like just put a little cut in the top of the knot & work it out. It would be very easy to cut their skin because the knots pull the skin upward. After buying numerous combs, I finally found the ultimate on Amazon–the Oster undercoat rake (stainless steel) which does a fabulous job taking out the thick undercoat without damaging the cat’s outer coat.

  3. Dorsey Taylor says:

    I think the biggest mistake breeders make is not keeping their kittens until they are 12 weeks old. I have seen many breeders release their puppies and kittens under 12 weeks of age. I will not even consider them.

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