The Beauty of Easter Lilies Probably Not Worth It for Cat Owners

| March 16, 2014 | 11 Comments

Easter LilyMost of us can identify Easter lilies just by looking at them. They’re the beautiful, trumpet-shaped white ornamental flowers that are very popular this time of year. But while they may be beautiful decorations, the dangers they pose to cats make them unsuitable in homes where felines can be found. Because Easter lilies will do more than just make your cat sick; they’ve actually been listed as part of the Top 20 Pet Toxins by the Animal Poison Control Center.

Easter lilies are in their entirety, very poisonous to cats – the stamen, stem, petals, leaves, pollen; all of them are very toxic to cats. And it also doesn’t matter if the plants are fresh or dried, as both forms pose a great danger to cats. Even placing them up high or in areas that the cat “can’t reach” is ineffective because as we all know, cats can jump, climb, and walk to just about anywhere that they want to go.

Of course, cat owners can’t keep an eye on their pets at all times, so it’s important to know what danger signs to look for just in case you were unaware of the poison the plant contained, and brought one into your home with your cat. Within the first 24 hours you might see vomiting and lethargy on the part of the cat, and they most likely won’t have an appetite. After 24 hours, an insatiable thirst along with an increase in urination are the most common symptoms. After this time however, urination may stop altogether as the kidneys may start to fail.

The only real answer to keeping cats safe from these plants are to not allow them in your home at all. There are many other plants and flowers that will keep your home beautiful during the spring, and that will keep your cat healthy and happy.

Read this Ragdoll of the Week story where the owner learned a hard lesson about cats and lilies.

 

Read more about things that poison cats:

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (11)

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  1. No ‘Probably’ about it. Thank you for sharing this info, as it’s surprising how many people are unaware of lilies toxicity to cats. You see all the displays this time of year in stores, and I have yet to see any warning sign posted…Scary!

  2. Dementia Boy says:

    Thanks, Jenny. I’ve seen so much suffering due to Easter lilies. Some cats make it; most don’t, and their deaths are horrible.

  3. Thanks for sharing this info, Jenny! I was already aware of this from some other posts comments on your website but I don’t think this info can be repeated TOO OFTEN. Thank goodness Our Little Princess isn’t exposed to any of these deadly plants.

    Big hugs!

    Patti & Pink Sugar 🙂

  4. Dementia Boy says:

    I agree, Patti. I’ve never seen anything as toxic as holiday lilies–not even antifreeze. At least cats have to slurp that. I think lilies feel good against cat fur; cats rub against the lilies, lick their fur and… Or the wind blows, and the stamens blow with the cat right there. I don’t care how pretty anything is, not even Brad or Angelina, much less a dang plant, it’s not worth my cats.

    Although I still do volunteer work at two shelters when spay and neuter season gets heavy, I refuse to go in near Easter. There’s nothing we can do; we’re not full service clinics. Even full service clinics can’t do anything if the damage has progressed too far–and this doesn’t take long. The treatment is intensive and expensive, and the cat is left with lasting damage. What really saddens me is when people leave their cats in Animal Control’s drop boxes overnight or over a weekend. What a horrible way to die.

    Do I sound morbid and depressing? Good, if it prevents one person from bringing a lily into the house. I’ve held too many dying cats, dehydrated, with nothing left to vomit, their vitals horrific, temperatures in the 90s. If I were to say I euthanized the cats, that would be illegal. I have a doctorate; I’m not a doctor. Do I still have nightmares? Yes.

    You’re right, Patti; it can’t be repeated enough. Thanks again to Jenny for reminding us.

    • DB, you are so awesome with everything you share with all of us and the work you do to help kitties.

      Bless you for your love of cats. I don’t know how you do everything you do (including being the last person to try and comfort a dying kitty) but I’m so thankful for people like you in this world!

      Lots of love coming your way from me and Pink Sugar! Can you feel it? THERE it is! ****LOVE*****

      Patti & Pink Sugar <3

      • Hmmmmmm. I had a BIG WARM, SNUGGLY HUGS in beween two chevrons but apparently that doesn’t translate with the processor for the comments.

        Let’s try this again: *****BIG WARM, SNUGGLY HUGS******

        <3

        • Dementia Boy says:

          A double-dip warm snuggly hug!! Yummers and purrs!! And right back at ya.

          We all do what we can to help–whether it’s a cat, a child, a senior–wait, that’s almost us!!–someone in distress. We may not have money to help, but we might be able to take someone to the church, doctor or grocery store. If we can’t do that, we can be friendly to people we meet.

          You’ve made me purr today!!

  5. ChristyB says:

    Thanks for the reminder Jenny. I’m still trying to remember to check every time before bringing plants and flowers into the house.

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