Ragdoll Cat Breeders in Texas

| February 18, 2010 | 23 Comments

Caymus, a Seal Mitted Ragdoll, Looking UpIf you’re looking for Ragdoll Cat breeders in Texas, then you’ve come to the right place. Floppycats.com has done extensive research on how to find a ragdoll cat breeder. When you’re considering finding a ragdoll kitten in Texas or Ragdoll kittens Houston Texas, you’ll probably want to find a breeder in Texas.

Are you a Ragdoll Breeder in Texas? Consider listing your cattery in Floppycats.com’s Free Breeder Directory. Or you can consider advertising on this page of the site.

Some search options include

Search for a breeder who is registered in a professional feline organization:

The International Cat Association

http://www.tica.org/

Cat Fancier’s Association

http://www.cfa.org/

The Ragdoll Fanciers Club International

http://www.rfci.org/

Ragdoll Fanciers Worldwide Club

http://rfwclub.org/

Ragdoll Breed Club

http://www.ragdollbreedclub.org/

Search Online:

When searching for Ragdoll cat breeders in Texas, it is difficult to weed out the good ones from the bad ones. Certainly word-of-mouth recommendations always comes highly welcomed. However, when you are not able to get a recommendation, you’ll want to ask the breeder a number of questions.

No matter how cute the ragdoll kitten in Texas is that you are investigating, you want to make sure that the breeder is reputable and a caring human being. Floppycats.com has compiled a list of questions you can ask breeders . The questions also list appropriate answers to the questions, so that you can be aware of a proper response.

When you are looking for a kitten Ragdoll sale, you want to be sure that you are getting a healthy and active kitten. No matter how cute the photos are on the cattery’s website, there could be underlying health problems. So that’s why referencing the list of questions you can ask breeders is so important.

As we’ve stated, word-of-mouth referrals are the best! If you have a Ragdoll kitten from a Ragdoll Cat Breeder, please share a photo of your beloved feline as well as your experience with the kitty’s breeder.

Or if you find a Ragdoll breeder through this site, end up buying a Ragdoll kitten in Texas, let us know! Come back here to share your recommendation.

Additional Resources:

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (23)

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  1. lINDA dAVIS says:

    YOU MAY PASS THIS ON TO BREEDERS IN THE TEXAS AREA I WAS CONTACTED BY A SHARON PALMER SHES BOUGHT A RAGDOLL IM SURE WITH NO BREEDING RIGHTS A MALE SHES LOOKING TO BUY A MINK FEMALE AT PET PRICE AND BREED IT I PRACTICE ONLY EARLY SPAY AND NEUTER SHE WONT BE GETTING ONE FROM ME BUT SHES LOCATED IN STEVENVILLE TEXAS PASS THE NAME ALONG TO ANY ONE IN THAT AREA IM IN ARKANSAS SHES PLANNING A TRIP TO COL9ORADO IN SEPTEMBER

  2. Hello! I’m desperate!

    We bought a Seal Point Bi-Color ragdoll kitten 8 weeks old. She is NOT what the Ragdoll literature says. She is not loveable, she does not want to be touched, she is not the sweet, lap kitty, adoring to owners at all. She was at an Amish breeder who kept her Ragolls in the barn. When we went to pick up the Ragdoll, I should have known there was trouble when she ran from any human who wanted to pick her up. Now she’s always irritated and nothing I do reassures her that my lap is a safe place and that I would be willing to love her if she loved me. But she doesn’t. We’ve had her for a week. There is another kitten (a few weeks older than her) in the house that she plays with. There is a 6 year old cat in the house that does not cause trouble. Please help me!!!!! I am so tempted to return her or give her away. I want the loveable kitty that Ragdolls are advertised to be!
    Susie

    • Jill #2...LOL says:

      First, she should have been kept with her mother for at least twelve weeks, not eight! Did you check out this “breeder” before you bought her? Did they get her fully vetted before you got her?
      Any reputable breeder will take back the kitten if things aren’t working out…they’ll want to do what’s best for it. Purposefully bred litters would never be kept outside either!
      Did you ask for references, or any other sort of validation? You should definitely contact them and see what they’ll tell you.

      On one hand, I hope you DID get a genuine Ragdoll and that maybe she will come around in time. On the other hand, I hope its not, only because it breaks my heart to hear of any being kept in those conditions! It’s possible you’ve been given a feral barn cat that was passed off as a Raggie, in which case, if you choose to put in the work, could still turn into a nice cat, but will likely not be the floppy baby you wanted.

      If I were you, I would contact the kitten makers, ask about the lineage and what their guarantees are. If they can’t produce anything, I would get my money back and make sure to research before getting another kitten. It would be hard to give her back, but if she isn’t what she was supposed to be, and it can’t be proven that she’s a purebred, I would definitely give her back.

      There are plenty of honest, wonderful breeders who would love to have one of their kittens go to your loving home!

      Good luck!

    • janet muse says:

      the bottom line is that your kitten is behaving as a feral cat. I would return it, get my money back, and purchase from a reputable breeder who socializes his/her kittens. your kitten is comfortable with other animals because it is feral and not socialized to humans. i would NEVER pay that kind of money for a feral cat. You want to find a purebred ragdoll breeder who raises litters underfoot… and you will then find the ragdoll of your dreams. Sorry to hear this happened to you.

  3. Paula says:

    Unfortunately it sounds like she was bread to be a barn cat. Good breeders exposé the kittens to the house so they are socialized and are used to human contact. How sad for those kitties. She sounds somewhat feral, not of the laid back sweet Ragdoll temperament at all.

  4. Sara LeMoine says:

    She only eight weeks old and seemly has not been properly socialized by the breeder. A week is a very short amount of time for any cat to adjust to a new home. She may not be the breed standard, but you have made a commitment to her by bringing her home and I urge you to honor that commitment. There are good signs that she is playing with other cats. She will gain socialization skills from these cats. To get her used to humans, engage her with interactive play, feather toys and such. Praise her and give her treats at the end of play sessions. Use the end of one of the feather toys to gently pet her. This way she can get used to being petted by a human yet has distance. Again, use treats to praise and gain her trust. There is an excellent guide to socializing timid cats/kittens from Best Friends. Please give her a chance and be a good guardian to her!

    http://www.bestfriends.org/nomorehomelesspets/pdf/CatSocialization.pdf

  5. Janice says:

    Susie,
    Had you been to visit your kitten when it was younger, or did you just pick her out by a picture from the breeder? A couple of thoughts/suggestions… she’s a baby and is still adjusting to her new surroundings; don’t chalk her up as not meeting the textbook description of a Ragdoll after only 1 week in her new home. Female cats of any breed are typically more aloof; I have 2 Ragdolls, my male is constantly by my side or on my lap, I can’t even go into the bathroom alone haha On the flip side, my female is very sweet natured, but tends to do her own thing and will occasionally bless me with a few minutes of her time LOL I hope you will give her a little more time to adjust to her new surroundings before you give up on her. Good Luck!

  6. Jim Peters says:

    Sorry To Hear About Your Situtation. It Took Our Kitten Almost 6 Mo Until she Wanted To Snuggle. Our Other Rag doll Was Really Affectionate.We Got Her As An Older Cat.
    Coming To your Lap Has to be Their Idea.You Can Not force this to Happen.
    It Just Happened A Week Ago. Our Brandy First Came to My wife’s Lap While Watching TV.The Next night to mine While I Was on the Computer. As A Kitten It is Part of the Maturing Process. Before That All Brandy Wanted To do Was Expell Energy. I Hope This Works For You. Also get a Book On Clicker Training They love the Attention Of being Trained. But Remember This Also Takes time. Our Brandy Now Comes,Sits,Stays,And Even Fetches. But It Wasn’t Easy To Get Her started
    Jim Peters

  7. Susie says:

    Thank you, everybody for your information!! I will make sure my boyfriend reads these comments, also, as we have to make our decisions together. We are in the middle of the road on some things, where we don’t know what to do either way. We are kind of brokenhearted—and we don’t know whether to ask for the breeder to take her back or allow her more time to get used to a new home and new owners. I had been giving her cat treats but gave up in despair. We had a feral cat before that I had rescued from a bush in the ghetto. She never did like to sit in human laps or be petted for 18 years. We were so hoping that this cat would be the opposite. Anyway, we will most likely give it more time before actually making some sort of commitment or ask the breeder to take her back. We are pretty sure she was raised in the barn with Persian cats and Labrador Retrievers that the Amish woman breeder also raised for sale. I have put in a call to her to ask her some more questions. She gave us the registration papers listing the sire and dam so we think she’s an actual Ragdoll. Anyway, truly I thank you guys for your help!
    Susie

  8. Michelle S says:

    Barn cat from an Amish “breeder”? That’s the problem right there! She is essentially a feral or semi-feral kitten. I could type a novel on socialization, but you would be best served to get involved with a group that will provide you with ongoing information and support. It is not too late if you act now. A very helpful group is: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/feral_cats/ Just request to join then post away. They also have TONS of resources in their files. You may have to set up a (free) Yahoo account, but I’m not positive about that. These are the people that work day in and day out with cats and kittens that need socialization. Cindy Carlson Johnson is 100% right! This IS a kitten mill, just like a puppy mill, and these people make me sick! My Pomeranian was rescued from a mill after being bred over and over for 6 years, and she suffered irreparable damage both physically and emotionally.

  9. MeLinda Hughes says:

    Thank you, folks, for encouraging the owner to keep this kitty. A week is never long enough to determine personality on a kitten. It can take months (as one person commented) for any cat to settle in, especially when it seems that this kitten was raised in a poor environment, and yes, I would report this breeder to TICA or CFA (if they are registered); otherwise, they are backyard breeders, and again, I would report them to local authorities, especially if the kitten was in poor condition. You are going to need to confine this kitten to a small space, work with it daily, and socialize it. You would have to put in the effort to make this kitten (and yes, kittens are malleable) the kitten you want it to be.

  10. janet mused says:

    yes, it’s true that you can do a lot of work to socialize your kitten. i have raised and socialized many a feral litter in my day. and it takes a LOT of work… but it is doable. But what I don’t understand is why you would pay that sort of pricetag for what is essentially a rescue kitten. If you wanted to socialized a feral kitten, you could have gone to the pound and paid thirty bucks. If you choose to keep this kitten, I would still demand a refund, and I would — most definitely — report this “breeder.”
    as a breeder of amazing purebred ragdoll kittens, I work RELENTLESSLY

  11. janet mused says:

    yes, it’s true that you can do a lot of work to socialize your kitten. i have raised and socialized many a feral litter in my day. and it takes a LOT of work… but it is doable. But what I don’t understand is why you would pay that sort of pricetag for what is essentially a rescue kitten. If you wanted to socialized a feral kitten, you could have gone to the pound and paid thirty bucks. If you choose to keep this kitten, I would still demand a refund, and I would — most definitely — report this “breeder.”
    as a breeder of amazing purebred ragdoll kittens, I work RELENTLESSLY to socialize my kittens so that my customers can feel good about the substantial purchase that they have just made… and so that my kittens are prepared to live as members of the family. again, I’m sorry to hear that this happened to you. You must always be skeptical of the people who are breeding and raising the animals you choose to bring into your household.

  12. Jim Peters says:

    This young It Should Be Able to be turned Around. Remember If You Do Return It. And I’m not saying That you shouldn’t. It May Not Go To A Good home, It’s A Living Thing That deserves A Chance. I Would Re Contact The Breeder And Tell Her About What you Have Learned Here. Comunicate! If She Is An Honest Amish Person She Should Be Interested In Working Things Out!
    Jim Peters

  13. gloria says:

    IVE BREED CATS FOR OVER 25 YEARS, I SEE ADVICE HERE TO REPORT THIS PERSON WHICH IS THE RIGHT THING TO DO IF THE CATS ARE IN NEGLECTED CONDITIONS JUST BECAUSE THIS AMISH PERSON IS RAISING THE KITTENS IN THE BARN DOESNT MAKE EVERY KITTEN A WILD CAT, ANY BREED OF CAT CAN HAVE A CRAZY KITTEN/CAT IT HAPPENS
    ALSO THE PARENTS PERSONALITY IS PASSED ON SO IF PARENTS ARE NOT FRIENDLY GOOD CHANCE THE PERSONSLITY TRAIT CAN HAPPEN IN THE OFFSPRING
    WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT IN RAISING AND BREEDING ANY ANIMALS IS THEY ARE KEPT IN CLEAN CONDITIONS, WELL FED, DOCTORED WHEN NEEDED AND THEY ARE NOT OVER BRED.
    THE MOTHER CATS COMPANY IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING A KITTEN NEEDS FOR THE FIRST 12 WEEKS THE KITTENS HAVE THE REST OF THEIR LIFE TO BOND WITH HUMANS. A RAGDOLLS GOOD SWEET RELAXED PERSONALITY IS BRED INTO IT THERE ARE MISFITS IN EVERY BREED AND FEMALES OFTEN CAN BE NOT LAP CATS.
    IF THE AMISH PERSON GIVES THESE CATS THE BASICS OF BEING WELL CARED FOR FOOD AND SHELTER REPORTING HER MAY CAUSE THESE CATS TO BE PUT TO DEATH THIS ADVICE GIVEN ON THIS SITUWATION OF REPORTING HER IS MAYBE NOT THE RIGHT THING.
    IVE SEEN MANY UNDERFOOT CATTERY OPERATIONS THAT ARE UNBEARABLE BREEDING CATS YOU NEED FACILITYS FOR THEM AND IT INVOLVES HAVING THE AREA TO DO IT IN NOT JUST RUNNING ALL OVER YOUR LIVING AREA ALSO FEMALES AND MALES NEED THEIR OWN SPACE DURING THE TIME OF RAISING THE KITTENS HAVING THE CATS IN CLEAN CONDITIONS IS THE MOST IMPORTAND THING BECAUSE IF ITS DIRTY AND STINKS SO WILL THE HEALTH OF THE CATS BE THE SAME WAY
    I DONT THINK A BARN CAN BE GOOD CONDITIONS AS THERE IS NO HEAT AND NO AIR COND
    THE LADY THAT BOUGHT THIS KITTEN NEEDS TO DECIDE WHAT IS THE RIGHT WAY TO HANDLE THE AMISH BREEDER SHE SAW IT AND SHE BOUGHT MUST NOT HAVE BEEN SO BAD OR SHE WOULD HAVE WALKED AWAY WITHOUT BUYING
    I HOPE THIS LITTLE FISH OUT OF WATER GETS A CHANCE SHE WILL FEEL SAFE IN A SMALL AREA ALSO IF YOU HAVE A LARGE PET TAXI THAT CAN BE PUT IN THE MAIN STREAM OF YOUR HOME LIFE SET UP WITH A BOX FOOD AND BED SHE CAN VIEW EVERYTHING, SHE WILL FEEL AT HOME IN THERE AS SHE IS USE TO BEING CAGED HOLD HER WHEN YOU WATCH TV MAKE SURE SHE FEELS SECURE WHEN NOT BEING HELD THIS PET TAXI WILL BE SECURE SHE WILL GET USE TO SEEING EVERYONE SHE WILL EAT HAVE HER BOX AND SHE WILL LATER BE ABLE AND READY TO JOIN YOUR HOME THERE IS HOPE THE WORSE THING IS FOR HER TO HIDE OUT UNDER THINGS AND TO DEVELOP THAT HABIT,
    IN A COUPLE WEEKS YOU OPEN THE DOOR IF SHE CHOOSES TO STAY IN THERE LET HER COME OR GO AS SHE WANTS THIS ALSO MAY WORK NOW I WOULD CLOSE THE DOOR WHEN NOT ABLE TO MONITOR WHAT SHE DOES
    I FOR SURE KNOW WHAT IM SAYING ,
    I WOULD BET SHE CHOOSES TO HANG IN THERE FOR A WHILE BUT THATSW OK SHE WILL EXPAND AS SHE FEELS SAFE THIS WILL WORK BEST
    SHE WILL ADJUST AS SHE WANTS AND SHE WILL HAVE HER SPACE SHES USE TO BEING CAGED IT WILL CHANGE

  14. janet muse says:

    while I agree with a lot of what you said, I do not agree that misfits come out of litters who are raised underfoot and well-socialized with humans: this is simple behavioral conditioning 101. There is a wide variety of scientific literature that supports this contention. Yes, it is indeed imperative that breeding cats are not over-bred to ensure the health of the breeders as well as the kittens; it is also crucial that both breeders and kittens are adequately supported through nutrition and sanitary living conditions. HOWEVER, it is equally as important that the kittens are well socialized with humans and household noises. If a kitten is not properly socialized, it will — in effect — begin to behave as a feral kitten. If all it knows is life with the litter and it’s mother, than it will behave as wild… and not a misfit. I raise my ragdolls underfoot, and have yet to raise a misfit kitten. ALL of the kittens that I have placed have been well-socialized, active members of their families — and they prefer the company of their humans. So while choosing a breeder, it is imperative to find one who employs all of these concepts: protecting the health and well-being of the breeders and the kittens, maintaining sanitary living conditions, complete and balanced nutritional support, AND many hours of socialization — specifically with human interaction. This kitten is still young enough to be worked with and socialized. My guess is that, as a result, it will continue to display some sort of neurosis throughout its lifetime, but not likely something that cant be lived with. I’m not saying return the kitten if you would like to continue to bond with it… but I most definitely would be having a conversation with the breeder about a full or partial refund for the purchase price. Because, as I said before, if you wanted to socialize a semi-feral kitten, you could have done a rescue cat.

  15. janet muse says:

    Here is a link to a study that was published in the journal of Veterinary Medicine called “Feline Socialization: how Environment and Early Learning Influence Behavior.”
    http://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search/display.do?f=1994/US/US94232.xml;US9420835

  16. janet muse says:

    Here is another link to a chapter in a great book called “The Ethology of Domestic Animals.” This chapter, “Human-Animal Relations” looks at the human/animal connection, and discusses the early socialization of animals with humans. Have a look for those who are interested. And, if you like, you might message me for more information so I don’t inundated the blog with research. Good luck. 🙂
    http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=FuJKSEgccUEC&oi=fnd&pg=PA102&dq=early+socialization+of+kittens&ots=qApPIlsmhv&sig=OK7h24v39YvewGt0WLWGY9M3pko#v=onepage&q=early%20socialization%20of%20kittens&f=false

  17. gloria says:

    THIS DISCUSSION IS TO HELP SUSIE GET THRU THIS ADJUSTMENT PERIOD WITH THIS LITTLE FEMALE KITTEN.
    SHES NOT A BREEDER AND SHE NEEDS ADVICE ON HOW TO WORK WITH THIS KITTEM
    THIS KITTEN NEEDS TO FEEL SAFE AND IS IN A PANIC BEING IN A NEW SPACE SHE NEEDS TO BE PUT IN A LARGE PET CARRIER SET UP AS HER HOME THIS NEEDS TO BE DONE IN THE MAIN PART OF HER NEW HOME
    THE WORSE THING FOR THE KITTEN TO DO IS HIDE AND GET THAT HABIT
    SHE WILL LIKE HER OWN SPACE AND IT WILL FEEL LIKE HOME
    SHE WILL LEARN TO BE COMFTORABLE WITH ALL THE NOISES OF HER NEW HOME, ALL SHE IS ONLY USE TO BEING IN A CAGE IN A BARN AFTER A COUPLE WEEKS OF THAT AND BEING HELD BY SUSIE WHEN SHE HAS TIME THIS CAT WILL COME AROUND SHE SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO HAVE THIS TAXI AS LONG AS SHE WANTS IT AND SHE WILL COME OUT OF BEING SO SCARED I UNLESS HER PERSONALITY IS A WILD ONE SHE INHERITED, HOPEFULLY NOT
    SHE MAY NEVER BE A LAP CAT BUT LOTS OF FEMALES ARENT THAT
    I WOULD SAY SPAY HER YOUNG IT CAN BE DONE AS EARLY AS 4 MONTHS
    THIS IS NOT A ISSUE ON WHAT BREEDERS DO TO RAISE THEIR CATS THEY SELL.

  18. janet muse says:

    With respect, it is an issue on breeders and how they raise their kitties. I’m just providing helpful information. Susie, if you decide on keeping your little girl, here is a link to the article on taming feral kittens. Your baby only sounds semi-feral due to lack of socialization… from what you described, it does not sound like she is completely wild and hissing or spitting at you. It’s likely that you can start at creating the safe room for her. This publication is from the feral cats coalition. It will give you some helpful food for thought on socializing your girl. Best of luck!!

    http://www.feralcat.com/pdf/taming-feral-kittens.pdf

  19. Barbie Heinen says:

    Many wonderful suggestions posted here. I just have one additional comment about the breeder to add. I clicked on your name and was taken to your blog where I saw the pictures of your precious baby. She is adorable. But if the breeder told you she is a seal bicolor, that may be one more strike against her knowledge of Ragdolls. It appears to me from her coloring, especially on her ears, that she is possibly a seal tortie bicolor. I’m certainly not an expert on Ragdoll coloring, but as far as I know, the ears of seal bicolor kittens are totally rimmed in seal coloring. Anyone else here agree? Am I wrong?

  20. Jim Peters says:

    I Hope You Have Learned One Good Thing From All Of These Posts.
    When Buying A Pure Bred Animal Or Even A Rescue Kitten ,There Is A lot more to it Than, HEY THAT’S A Pretty Kitty! HOW CHEEP CAN I GET IT? I Don’t Mean That To Be Harsh Because 30 Years Ago That’s Were I Started Out. It’s An Educational Process With Responsibilities. The Hardist Thing To Get Across To My Family Was NOT TO BE PENNYWISE AND POUND FOLISH! The Good News Is That WE Of This Site Are here for You. good Luck. Jim Peters

  21. Susie says:

    Thank you guys so much for the information!!! It is definitely helping. I really appreciate everybody’s point of view and we are working very hard to help the kittie through this process.

    Susie

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