Litter Boxes for High Spraying Cats

| February 23, 2016 | 32 Comments

Litter Boxes for High Spraying Cats

I am only aware of two litter boxes that are on the market that can work for high spraying cats.  My mom’s cats, Caymus and Murphy, pee almost standing up, or as they pee, they lift their bottoms, whereas Charlie and Trigg keep stay in a squatting position the entire time they are peeing.  My mom had to get high sided litterboxes because of that problem.  When I discovered high sided litter boxes also helped to keep the litter inside the box, it made me want some as well.  We have previously reviewed the NVR Miss litterbox – which I love.  However, they are not high enough for my parents’ cats.  My parents ended up buying a plastic storage container like a Rubbermaid one.  This video shows the boxes my mom went with – but it’s a video of Caymus rolling around in his litterbox.

And I have recently comes across the IRIS Open Top Litter Box with Shield and Scoop as well.  There are also quite a few high sided litterboxes on Amazon.

Do you know of any others?

NVR Miss

NVR MIss litter box

IRIS Open Top Litter Box with Shield and Scoop

IRIS Open Top Litter Box with Shield and Scoop

The NVR Miss can be purchased directly from NVR Miss on their website.

The IRIS Open Top Litter Box with Shield and Scoop is sold on Amazon for $12.99.  The IRIS comes with a litter scoop, but as all of you know, my favorite litter scoop on the planet is the Litter Lifter.

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Category: Litter Box, Poo

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (32)

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  1. Suzanne says:

    You can also just buy storage boxes. My cats don’t spray, but they like ample boxes, so I buy large storage boxes instead of standard litter boxes because they just aren’t big enough, and my cats aren’t real big!
    I get ones only about 7 or 8 inches tall, but a few feet long. They come in so many sizes!
    So much less expensive too.☺

    • Jenny says:

      yes, i used to have those, but I didn’t like watching them jump in and out of them…guess you could always cut a hole. do you cut a hole?

      • Becky Burciaga says:

        Since I have two large Maine Coons, standard litter boxes don’t work for us. I’ve used large storage boxes and cut an opening in the side with an exacto knife, then used the flame from a lighter to seal the plastic…otherwise the sides are pretty rough, and sharp. The kitties use the boxes without a problem.

        High Sided Litter Box Made from a Storage Container

        High Sided Litter Box Made from a Storage Container

    • Elizabeth says:

      I find clear plastic storage boxes work best for our “Buddy.” I’ve tried the boxes for high spraying cats, but Buddy has inadvertently positioned his working end out the open entry. Yes, he has to jump into and out of the large sided storage box, but that’s good exercise for him!

  2. Those are both good for height but I recommend the NVR Miss. Btw, you’re video shows two stacked. If you want one with higher sides, the only other option is a DIY project with Rubbermaid type of storage containers.

    • Jenny says:

      Hey Layla,

      Yes, the thumbnail image of the video does show two stacked together, but the video, does not. I took that still photo of Caymus when I brought the boxes into the house, he immediately got in it and wanted to go the bathroom before I could get them separated (it already had litter in it). Yes, the Rubbermaid ones are great, and actually the NVR Miss sometimes isn’t high enough and you have to stack another one – Harold has a photo of how to do it, but I am not sure if it is on his site or if I’ve just seen it through email.

      Thanks for sharing!
      Jenny

  3. Gloria Weissman says:

    I have the NVR Miss that my 17 year old Ragdoll uses. He has a habit of standing up while peeing. Sometimes, with the NVR Miss, he will stand up with his behind facing the opening, and ends up peeing on the mat underneath. Any suggestions?

    • Jenny says:

      Gloria, I am sorry to hear that – I forwarded your comment onto NVR Miss. I know they have stacked them to make them go up higher – maybe you need one that has no opening?

      • Gloria Weissman says:

        Jenny, In addition to the NVR Miss, I have 2 covered boxes from Petco. They are large. Sometimes my boy will even pee outside the box when he positions himself with his back end towards the opening. I’m thinking storage boxes might be next.

    • Dementia Boy says:

      This guy sounds like he wants open space behind his tail. So, if this hypothesis is correct, how do you accommodate that? Turn the NVR Miss around and put disposable material on the wall/floor? If he doesn’t like plastic, I’m not sure how the storage boxes would help.

  4. Robotika says:

    I have the NVR Miss and, unfortunately, my boys will still elevator butt over the top of it. I think the size is too small too. They prefer something roomier and I’m debating getting storage boxes instead. So, preferably, a MUCH larger box with more room would be ideal.

    If you happen to have cats who do have elevator butt when peeing, I wouldn’t recommend NVR Miss. If yours don’t really do it, then go for it.

    Finding a decent litter box is a bit of a crap shoot (haha) and one can end up spending a lot just to find the perfect solution.

    • Jenny says:

      Bummer, sorry to hear that.

      What do you use?

      • Robotika says:

        I’m still using the NVR Miss and wipe it down and the surrounding area when they do go over. It’s a pain, but it has to do for now. I do have a covered box as well, but my boys and I seem to prefer not having a lid. I’m looking for a replacement for the NVR Miss that has a lot of room to move. I’ll most likely have to alter a plastic storage box instead.

        • Nicole says:

          That’s what I ended up doing, too…altering a storage box. Even that took two tries, because the first time, I cut a fairly deep hole in the side of the box, figuring 8″ up from the bottom should be sufficient to contain the pee. Our boy pees standing up, quite typically with his rear towards the opening (of course). What I found is that I had to get the biggest, tallest storage container Target had and then cut an opening from the top that only came down 4″. It means that the cats do have to jump into their litter boxes, but neither of them seems to mind that and I’m not cleaning pee off the floor anymore. Hallelujah to that! 🙂

  5. Beth says:

    Like Suzanne, I use the big plastic storage totes. Brand name (Rubbermaid) are the best quality, more durable, but the cheap ones last a long time also. They’re too high for a small kitten to get in and out of easily so I’ve had to use regular litter boxes when there was a new baby in the house. Also we ran into problems with our old kitty when he was weak and sick. Otherwise the storage totes work great!

  6. sondi moore says:

    I use The Breeze Litter System and that top covers the back half of the box and is easily removalable and washable. Here is a suggestion we use with our clients who don’t want to change boxes. Get some Peel and Stick (or Peel and Press). It’s like Saran Wrap. If the box is against a wall or the tub, pull out enough to press 12+” on the side of the wall/tub and let it hang into the litter box. Press it at the back side of the box and push litter against it. The pee will run down the wrap and into the box. Our client’s think we are so smart!

  7. Cindy says:

    We use these two boxes for the high peeing. They work pretty well.

    Natures Miracle Advanced High Side Corner Litter Pan

    and

    Clevercat Top Entry Litterbox

    I hope this will be useful for you!

  8. Dementia Boy says:

    Molly of Mythicbells Persians uses the Egg Pod bed as a litter box for her – como se dice – high pee-ers. I know you’ve reviewed the Egg Pod previously as a bed, but Molly’s had great success with it as a litter box. I have her video on my YouTube home page – just look for something bright pink – but, being technologically impaired, I don’t know how to transfer it here. The video also shows another litter box that she’s customized for high pee-ers.

    • Jenny says:

      wow – there’s an idea! have you heard of that story about the cat that was found dead inside of a pei pod because it flipped over and he couldn’t get out and since there were no air holes, he died of suffocation?

      if you have a link to the mythicbells video, love to see it – tried to find it on your youtube but couldnt

      • Gloria Weissman says:

        I read somewhere that the pod be that the cat allegedly suffocated in was one made in China, which had no air holes, unlike the original. So if you are using that one, drill holes in it.

      • Dementia Boy says:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBk56ASxznY#t=16

        Here’s the link to Molly’s video. Kalahari, one of Molly’s sprayers, is a big galoot, weighing in at 12 lbs., twice the size of his parents. He’s very tall, so if this works for him, I’d think it would work for Ragdolls.

        The suffocated cat story is discussed in the comments, but it looks like Molly’s eggs have air holes.

        • Gloria Weissman says:

          What prevents the cat from spraying out the front of the pod. Great if your cat sprayed towards the back and sides, but the front is low.

          • Dementia Boy says:

            Gloria, I think your boy is unusual – maybe not. Being in the litter box is such a vulnerable position for a cat; cats I’ve known will squeeze around so that they see the front or wherever traffic is. They don’t want to be surprised by someone coming up to their backside.

            So the good thing is it sounds like your boy feels safe. Now, how to get him to turn around??? Has he always peed like this? What’s his temperament like?

          • Dementia Boy says:

            Gloria, I turned to Molly of Mythicbells for some possible solutions to Bandit’s problems. In a stream of consciousness, she suggested a whole bunch of stuff in the egg bed link above. Hope something helps.

        • Jenny says:

          watched it – why doesn’t she use litter?

          no, hers don’t have air holes – just paw print indents….hers is not a pei pod.

          • Dementia Boy says:

            Molly has so many different boxes, some with litter, some without. She is a woman on a mission =)

            My meth lab cat couldn’t stand litter – his peeing habits were quite strange, as was he – and I tried the paper towel thing and it worked!! I think I got the idea from Anitra Frazier.

  9. Gloria Weissman says:

    Dementia Boy,

    My boy is the biggest moosh you will find. He’s not afraid that some other cat will attack him while in the box. And no, he hasn’t always sprayed outside the box, it’s just that he has gotten older, and I think lazier, because he also doesn’t cover his poops or pees, so I know which are his. I have a long rug runner under the boxes, so when I see it’s wet, I know it’s him. In order to protect my carpet, I have put some puddle pads under under the rug. None of my other 3 cats spray outside the box, nor have any of my 2 previous Ragdolls. Bandit is the last one of my Ragdolls. He has already lived longer than his brother and sister who passed at 15 and 16.

    • Dementia Boy says:

      Lalalalaughing. Oh, Bandit couldn’t be a bigger moosh – love that word – than my William. Ask for a stereotype, a caricature, really, of a Ragdoll, and 19-lb. William would win, paws down. For 18-1/2 years, he allowed a snarky 8-lb diva to terrorize and abuse him. Jolie would run into the bathroom with William in hot pursuit, stopping just an inch or so before the tub and then spin around and run in the opposite direction. William, of course, would run full speed into the tub, nearly conking himself out. He never caught on. This made Jolie quite happy.

      Just a suggestion, although it makes me squirmy to say this: Look up the symptoms of feline cognitive dysfunction. (There’s a reason why my ID is Dementia Boy.) I didn’t realize William had severe cognitive dysfunction until he was 22 and began attacking the other cats, a very un-William thing to do. I looked up the symptoms and realized William had all of them except for inappropriate elimination, which is usually the first symptom. I had attributed the subtle changes in behavior to his being partially blind, partially deaf and, quite honestly, not the sharpest claw on the paw. Also, he had a helper cat, sweet Isabella (“Izzy”), who would track him down when he got lost and lead him back to bed. And, admittedly, I was somewhat in a daze during the last six months of his life as the love of my life, crazy, feisty roller derby queen Zen, was dying. So I wasn’t really paying attention to William. As long as he flopped and purred and billy goat jumped on the cat trees and cat walks, I thought he was okay.

      Medication worked well for two years, but when William was 24-1/3, without warning,without provocation, right in front of my eyes, two weeks after Zen’s death, he sliced open Isabella. I took her to ER first; then I went home and brought William back for euthanasia. By then, he had forgotten what he had done, despite all the blood, and was purring and flopping. I didn’t want it to end that way.

      Hopefully Bandit doesn’t have cognitive dysfunction. But given the lifespan of his siblings, it’s something to check out. You can always count on me for cheery info =(

  10. harold says:

    Hello everyone. I see that we have a host of litterbox issues to deal with and Jenny has suggested that I address them on this forum. I will take her up on that, and share insights and ideas on what can be done to mitigate these issues.

    First off though, a story and a question.

    A family with three male cats, all neutered was fostering a fourth cat (Foster) that was dropped off at a shelter for “innapropriate elimination”.

    They ordered two litterboxes, and shortly after delivery, I got an email explaining that Foster was clearing the top of the litterbox, by a lot.

    The solution to this super high peeing issue was to make a wall extension that enabled the height of the litterbox to reach 18 inches.

    The question is, why was Foster a problem? I have a theory. The first reader that determines what that theory is, will get a NVR Miss Litterbox.

  11. Dementia Boy says:

    Hi, Harold,

    Is your theory that Foster was going out of his way to establish territory, as he was the new kid on the block? He had to be a bigger cat than the other cats (“oooh, a tiger in the house”) so the other cats would know he was a tough guy, even if he wasn’t.

    • Dementia Boy says:

      P.S. Foster already had an inappropriate elimination problem. The family knew this fostering him. He should have had his own brand new litter box, perhaps apart from the others, so he wouldn’t smell cat and get stressed like he did at his old house.

  12. Patti Johnson says:

    I am a HUGE fan of the NVR Miss Litterbox! Prior to that I was using the same Nature’s Miracle Advanced High Sided Corner Litter Box that Cindy referenced in her comment on June 8, 2014 (above). Both were very well for our Miss Pink Sugarbelle but I prefer the NVR Miss Litterbox as they look a bit more stylish to me and their functionality works great for my baby girl!!! 🙂 <3

    Big hugs!

    Patti & Miss Pink Sugarbelle 🙂 <3

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