How to Clean Poop Off Cat Fur

Share:

trigg_in_world_s_best_cat_litterOne of the questions I get asked a lot by cat owners is what kind of cat wipes I use on my cats for things like how to clean poop off of cat fur.  I have posted about dry shampoo and wipes before – I am really against them.  Before using a wipe on your Ragdoll cat, think about this: whatever residue is left on their fur, they can and will lick it off. Can you imagine doing that yourself? Think about licking a baby wipe over and over again – and that’s what a cat has to do when you use one on its fur.

OK, so don’t use cat wipes – but how do you take care of the immediate problem?

Below are many different suggestions from pet owners for how to get poop of a cat’s fur which was discussed on our Facebook page, including some suggestions for how to clean cat fur without water, but please do keep in mind the disclaimer above before putting anything on your kitty’s fur.  There are times, I understand, when a wipe is necessary, so that’s why I included them below.

Short Term Solutions:

  • Water and rag. Keeping water and a rag handy is probably the simplest way to clean up and avoid using chemicals. You can keep some pieces of paper towel or a rag in a bag with a water bottle if you need to bring something with you on the go.
  • Brushing and trimming. You can also brush and trim out dried poop clumps at home. Try putting a little powder on clumps if need be to dry them out before brushing or trimming.
  • Biogroom Klean Kitty ShampooShampoo. You can dilute some cat shampoo with water and use that to wipe off your cat, or try a rinse-less spray shampoo like Biogroom.
  • Bath. You can also always give them a bath if needed. If you have a calm kitty, you can give them a “butt bath” – just dipping their backside in the sink and wiping away the poop clumps. Or if you give them a full bath, try to catch them at a time when they are a bit sleepy and will be more relaxed.
  • Wipes. Some pet owners recommend wipes that are made to be more pet-friendly:

Potential Long Term Solutions:

  • Changing food. The poop in fur issue could be a result of your cat passing loose waste, which could be solved by reevaluating their diet (maybe switching to preservative and additive free), or just mixing some canned pumpkin into wet food if it is a short-term cat health issue.  Please read catinfo.org for more info on proper feline nutrition.
  • Adjust litter level. Try adjusting the litter level in the litter box, as they could just be having some problems with squatting at the right level.
  • Hygiene cut. Try taking your cat to a groomer or a vet for a hygiene cut, which means trimming the fur around their bottom. You will need to do this regularly, but it can decrease the potential for poop to get stuck in fur.

Before you buy wipes for your cat, see if other options for how to clean a cat’s bottom, like rinsing it with water or a hygiene cut.

What suggestions do you have for how to clean poop off cat fur?

Comments (8)

  1. I generally just use very diluted Earthbath cat shampoo on heavy duty (pardon the pun 🙂 ) paper towels. The wipes I’ve tried are too dry and don’t do a good enough job. Basically, place cat on the counter near the sink and get someone to hold the cat while you wash his/her bottom (sort of grab the clump and hair in the wet/ slightly soapy paper towels and gently remove the poop. Then rinse with a very wet paper towel. It only takes a few seconds and I find this easier than a full butt wash … of course, it depends on the amount of poop your dealing with and whether or not it was very loose. I can do this by myself if necessary, by holding the scruff with one hand and washing with the other. One of my cats is more apt to allow this than the other. Thank goodness he’s the bigger and heavier of the two 🙂

  2. Simon is pure white and I notice immediately when he has a poopy bottom. The warm water washcloth works well followed by a combing of any of the hair left with poop. I haven’t had a big issue yet so I will see if I nee more interventions down the road.

  3. Jenny,

    The Wahl Pocket Pro trimmer is THE best thing for anything to do with the rump of a cat. Forget thinning shears. Forget dangerous pointy scizzors. Forget having someone to even have to hold the cat for you.

    These palm-sized single-battery operated trimmers are just like full-sized ones the barber used. Only, they’re tiny, really quiet, and have never bothered my cat — even the hardest to handle one. And they’ll remove dried or wet poop, as well as matts so, so very easily. Even with matts, and the blade pressed right upon their skin, one can tenderly keep up with any matt or tricky “hair issue” problem that might be forming..

    I’d never be without them. Highly recommended: Wahl Pocket Trimmer

    Best,
    Linda

    1. I’ve always just cut off the bit of offending fur with scissors, while my spouse holds our cat, but I do like the idea of a trimmer. I use Wahl as a trusted brand for cutting our family’s hair, but I didn’t know about the animal hair trimmers. Definitely worth a look, thanks Linda!

      1. Hi, Simeon,

        Glad I could help. Just know these are not sharp, like professional people trimmers. High expectations might disappoint you. However, they do do the job. (I did see on reviews, some had negative comments about that.). These are inexpensive trimmers, but they do do the job…

        Checking my “orders” on Amazon, they were called “Equine” trimmers. When I was going to reply to this post with the link, however, they came up as unavailable. Even searching for “Wahl Pocket Pro” or “equine trimmers” brought up nothing. I had to do a google search and see pictures, to come up with that one Amazon link. However, once there, I see other postings. Have no idea why. I did see one of those links was for Amazon Prime and did have free shipping. Here’s that link. It’s less expensive and looks a tad different. Not sure if it’s the same thing,

        For wet poo, I snag the higher hairs with the trimmers teeth. The weight of the “load” 🙂 makes it so the next hairs to trim show up. Little by little, the offending present falls off. As for dried, thank goodness, they’re floppycats. (Mine is a RagaMuffin, though, vs. a RadDoll.). Just have the kitty on its rump or back, kitchy-kooing it’s belly or chin, and they don’t even seem to be aware there’s something going on below.

        For matts, it’s the same belly-up thing, but touching them nearby, whilst grabbing the exposed outer single hairs of the matt, allow you to slowly attach the matt by going AROUND it. They seem to know you’re trying to help them. Eventually, the entire thing gets done. I’ve even put the head of the trimmers right on the belly attacking a clump, with no adverse reactions.

        You gotta have these with a long-haired cat. I don’t know what they used them for with equines, but I’d recommend them highly. Small enough they lie upon your fingers, vibrating a little, while you direct the head. You hold the “on” button with your thumb. (By the way, they shut off the moment you remove your thumb from the on button.)

        Many thanks for your nice comment!
        Linda

  4. Such a great post and very useful information, Jenny! (Especially, for us long hair cat lovers!)

    Having had a long-haired cat before as well as bushy-bottomed doggies, I knew that as soon as we got our baby girl we would need to keep her back fur trimmed about every 2-3 months to help prevent “poopy fur cleaning” on her backside. This solution has worked well for us but it’s a two person job. My hubby has to hold her and soothe her while I also talk softly and work like a maniac with my fingers (which can always be washed later…I’m not squeamish about getting a bit of cat poo on my fingers) and my dedicated butt fur trimming scissors. My fingers are always between her body and the scissors to prevent any horrible accidents that could happen. I do a pretty good job at getting the job done quickly. It’s nerve-wracking for us and her but worth it. Using this method we really don’t have to worry about cleaning her bottom very much at all. Worst case scenario: We don’t trim her fur for awhile and she gets a poopy bottom. Then I use old wash clothes and water and then just double-bag them up and toss the dirty wash clothes in the trash. Then, once her bottom dries we end up trimming the long hair away to get rid of any remaining traces. (We have learned to not miss butt fur trimming time. I have a reminder setup in my gmail calendar. lol)

    Having long-haired cats and/or babies (or both) changes your entire attitude of being afraid to get a little poo on you. Life is messy, right? Right! NOTE: My hubby is a bit squeamish about it all. Man fought in the Vietnam War but would pass out if he had to touch anything with poo on it. Seriously. In my opinion, once you are a “mom” (and that includes kitty & doggie “moms”) you get over your “poo fear” pretty quickly. And kudos to all the kitty “dads” out there who can deal with it, too!

    Big hugs & lots of love!

    Patti & Miss Pink Sugarbelle 🙂 <3

  5. After having almost 20 cats during the last 30 years, have learned that trying to put them in a sink or bath tub is too traumatic for me and them IMO. So, we use Pet Head Cat Shampoo on a wet towel and wash their back end while they are standing with their feet firmly planted on the floor. That seems to give them the confidence that they aren’t being out into some kind of water and also, they don’t hear the dreaded water running. The Pet Head shampoo is a foam and smells like watermelons! It immediately takes out any awful smell and leaves their fur very clean and smelling great.

Leave a Reply