How to Brush Cat Teeth

| February 9, 2010 | 3 Comments

When you think of how to brush cat teeth, you might be thinking, “Yeah, right. Dream on, people!” However, it is possible. Depending on the age of your cat and your cat’s general personality, you might have to take a few more steps to get to the point where you are actually brushing. As with most things with cats, you need to approach the situation in a calm and patient manner…as your cat will take longer to accept the idea than you will!

Of course, as with most things, like trimming your cat’s claws, it is best to start this endeavor when she or he is a kitten, so that it is a part of the normal everyday process. However, that isn’t always the ideal situation; therefore, Floppycats.com has included tips on how to approach brushing your older cat’s teeth.

Since dentals can run upwards of $500/visit, brushing your cat’s teeth from the get-go can be a money saving routine that you share with your cat. Many cats suffer from Periodontal Disease. Daily brushing helps to safeguard your cat from periodontal disease.

Cornell University has a lot of great videos on a number of “How To’s” for your cat, their video on how to brush cat teeth, is definitely one to be seen. They show you a 4-week process, where you first introduce your cat to the idea then onto full on brushing.

What you’ll need in order to complete the “How To Brush Cat Teeth” process:

  1. Cat Toothbrush
  2. Cat Toothpaste – Flavored to appeal to cats – you can buy them from your veterinarian or from a pet supply store.

The 4-week Process of How to Brush Cat Teeth

(this process is especially important if you have an older cat that you are trying to get used to the idea of having his or her teeth brushed):

  1. Week 1– Let your cat get used to the taste of the toothpaste, which is usually flavored to appeal to their pallets.
  2. Week 2 – Start putting the toothpaste on your finger and begin to touch your cat’s canines with your finger that has the toothpaste on it. Follow this process by a reward, like giving your cat his or her favorite treat.
  3. Week 3 – Put the cat toothpaste on the cat toothbrush and start to put the toothbrush in the cat’s mouth, so that the cat gets used to the feel of the toothbrush in his or her mouth.
  4. Week 4 – Start to brush your cat’s teeth. Only do the outside of your cat’s teeth, don’t bother going on the inside of the teeth, as their tongue can pretty much take care of that area.

Floppycats.com has searched the Internet to find some great cat toothbrushes and toothpastes, they are listed below. If you are interested in purchasing them, just click on the photo and it will take you to the site where you can purchase them. It is very important that you use cat toothpaste because cats cannot spit out toothpaste, therefore they cannot have human toothpaste, as the fluoride and detergent in human toothpaste will upset their GI tract.

Dr. Greg McDonald’s Video on How to Brush Cat Teeth

This is Floppycats.com’s Caymus getting his teeth brushed for the second time!

C.E.T. Toothpaste Poultry Flavor 2.5 Oz.

This is the toothpaste I use in the video that Caymus loves:

C.E.T. Toothpaste Poultry Flavor 2.5 Oz. – Poultry flavored enzymatic toothpaste for use with dogs and cats as part of an essential program for the pet’s oral health.

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Category: Cat Grooming, Health Care, Ragdoll Cat Behavior, Ragdoll Cat Videos, Recommended Products

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

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Sites That Link to this Post

  1. Cat Grooming Help | February 4, 2011
  2. Caymus and Murphy's Cat Dental Cleaning | February 10, 2011
  1. Audrey McKenzie says:

    Hello Jenny! I have recently adopted an 8 years old rag doll from, Rescue Me! and she loves to go in and out of my enclosed patio door. My problem is that the standard aluminum pet doors measure at 77 5/8 inches in length and my door frame measures 75 inches. Do you know where I can purchase a shorter door?

    Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated!

    Thank you for the Floppy Cat website, too!

    Audrey McKenzie
    a1950_99@yahoo.com

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