History of Ragdolls

| February 7, 2015 | 9 Comments

Rags on Bed

History of Ragdolls

The History of Ragdolls is not that extensive because Ragdolls are a relatively new breed of cat compared to others. The first Ragdolls were bred California in the 1960s by Ann Baker.

Baker bred a white Angora Persian type cat queen, Josephine, who had a Himalayan coat pattern (Siamese) to beautiful longhaired Burmese sire and Birman sire males. The breeding resulted in cats of substantial size, non-matting coat and a very equable disposition.

Josephine’s kittens seemed to have a true loving nature and beautiful blue eyes. Baker soon knew these kittens were very special. She kept some of them and bred them very carefully.

The kittens with the desired looks were kept and carefully line bred to keep the strain pure. In fact, all Ragdolls must be descendents of Josephine. No other strain of Persian, Birman, or Burmese has been introduced. The traits of the Ragdoll cat can only be found in Josephine’s descendents where the history of Ragdolls exists. The looks may vary slightly as to pattern or color, but the disposition must remain the same to be a Ragdoll. No one, not even the originator, can add to the lines at this time, and still have a purebred Ragdoll.

The Ragdoll is floppy when relaxed. A Ragdoll’s behavior is highly typical of Birman’s who are the most laid-back of cats.

Originally colors for the Ragdoll were the four standard Himalayan; Seal, Chocolate, Blue and Lilac, either as Solid Points (as in the Siamese) or Mitted (as in the Birman) or as Bi-Colors.

Since then, Ragdoll breeders have extended the range immensely to include Tortie Point, Tabby Point, Tortie Tabby Point (all Solid or Mitted) and Bi-Color Pointed, in a wide range of colors.

Ragdolls are family cats who will walk away from annoyance rather than retaliate. The Ragdoll has developed very rapidly in popularity; in 1994, 393 kittens were registered and this rose to 1,376 in 2003. Learn more about why people choose Ragdoll Cats or floppy cat.

Although Ragdolls have no particular health problems, it makes good sense to insure your cats. More and more owners are now insuring their pets as advances in veterinary medicine, plus the soaring costs of drugs can mean astronomical bills. More people claim on their pet insurance than home or motor policies.

Read more about the History of Ragdolls.

You can learn more about Ragdoll history, too, by reading about
RagaMuffin History

HISTORY OF RAGDOLLS

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Category: Adult Ragdoll Cat Pictures, History of Ragdolls, Ragdoll Cat, Ragdoll Cat Behavior, Ragdoll Cat Pictures

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (9)

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  1. Pam Polisson says:

    Hello,
    I had 2 beautiful ragdolls. I just lost my Cirus on Sunday due to a cyst on his spine and the vets said he had to be put down..In a matter of 3 hours he was gone,,,happened so fast one minute he was fine and ten minutes later he is crying coming down the stairs and he was just dragging his back legs behind. He was only 3 and a half, way to soon to be gone. I have his brother still but he is so afraid of just about everything…poor baby. The vet mentioned this breed having an underlining heart problem.Has anyone else experienced this? He was MY BOY and I am so heartbroken..We brought him home and he is buried in the garden with all the other past pets even a few chickens. I have 3 cats..my older tabby safari my siamese mss brown and Cirus’s brother Petie….don’t get me wrong i love all my animals but he was just special! Has anyone else had a issue like this?

  2. Barbara Hirsch says:

    Put this on Floppycats FB page, but saw you wanted the response here:

    HCM. I know about it because Siberians can get it too. It’s important to go to a breeder that checks their lines for known genetic problems:

    http://www.fabcats.org/hcm/

    I’m so sorry about your baby. It’s just heartbreaking to lose a furry friend, especially before his time. RIP Cirus.

  3. Jennifer says:

    Any cat can have a heart condition called HCM. Scientists have found the genes that cause this in Ragdolls and Maine Coons. So, it’s not that ragdolls are more prone than other breeds, just more awareness is there, because they can test for it. Good breeders DNA test their breeding cats for both sets of genes, and do not use cats that test positive. HTH.

    As for Cirus, I am very, very sorry for your loss.

  4. B^!!^J says:

    I, too, would like to express my heartfelt condolences over the loss of your special baby. Three and a half years is too young for any kitten to pass away and my heart breaks for you! I do hope you find another breeder, one that does genetic testing for HCM. An honest breeder won’t offer “sales” or “special discounts”. I would suggest looking for one that categorize thier kittens as show quality or pet quality. Angel Mae has a brown spot on the back of her right knee that eliminated her from the show table but I love that spot because it put her in my arms! HCM testing may be just ONE of the things people are referring to when they recommend you select a reputable breeder. Please accept this virtual “hug” in yoyur sorrow but it sounds like Cirus is among friends that knew and loved you.

    B^!!^J

    That’s only the beginning. I had my Angel Mae in to see my vet of over ten years within 24 hours.

    My friends thought I was out of my mind for what I paid for a CAT but I trusted my breeder and I am confident I selected sweet companion that will be with me for many, many years.
    The breeder not only posted on her website that her breeders were “tested negistive the HCM gene through DNA testing” and all of her kittens were sold with a state health certificate but she also provided proof that her kittens were HCM tested as well. My friends thought I was out of my mind for what I paid for a CAT but I was confident I was investing in a sweet companion that will be with me for many, many years. HCM testing just might be one of the things people are referring to when they recommend you select a reputable breeder.

  5. B^!!^J says:

    Oops! That stuff ran on below my initials was off the screen and I forgot it was there. I intended to delete it but I was boiling eggs for deviled eggs tomorrow and forgot the text was there. Please chalk it up as bad holiday multitasking! Kiss your other babies on the noggin for me because I know they miss Cirus as well.

  6. Peggy Russell says:

    Thanks from the advice. Found a breeder and bought another
    We will have him in May. Cisco will have a playmate
    And we will have a little Ragdoll.
    Everyone should have two Ragdolls. Will send pictures.
    Cisco will be 10 months in March.
    Jenny just wanted you to know you have the cutest laugh.
    I love you videos.
    Peg

  7. Joan Hudak says:

    Well, i had a kitten (Muggzy) i thougt was purebred Ragdoll, later found out he was 1/2 ragdoll 1/2 Himalayan, beautiful combination, but i was fooled all the way around, i was distraught to find out that my poor beautiful baby 1000.00 later and much mental distrss and obviously physical for Muggs, was diagnosed with F.I.P FELINE INTESTINAL PERITONITIS, i stress this because i was informed that Ragdolls and persians, Birmans are prone to this till 3 yrs of age.. My Bowdie is 21/2, so ive held my breath for close to 3yrs now, praying for perfect mental and physical health… He,s pure Ragdoll. This information was given to me by my veterinarian. He claims to be a Cat Speacialist. I believe in his early yrs. That was his primary interest in the animal kingdom, but i dont see the compassion there. I was told FIP, was basically a death sentence, only 10% servive ,there is no cure and or vaccine for this disease. I push this information as much as I can. I contacted the Ragdoll Cat Association, told them my story . I was pleased i was emailed back by 2 of the head people there. One informed me that she currently attened a conference on that topic, and that FIP was not necessarily a disease specific to any Breed. I did research myself, contaced the Michigan State University Vetrinarian School and they did say in articles on there website that certain breeds seem to be prone to FIP. MAINE COONS ,BIRMANS, RAGDOLLS, AND BIRMANS.. Just information i wish i knew prior to jumping the gun and buyi g a kitten from totally irresponsible breeder’s. These are usually people using any breed for revenue. Theres very little concern about the cat or kitten itself. It makes me sad. I wish we could put a stop to these breeders. .

  8. Joan Hudak says:

    Don’t buy kittens from people offering discount’s etc, on their kitten’s. The Breeder i bought Muggzy from, continued to email me repeatedly. Once i called her back, even though I wasn’t experienced in purebred cats or dealing with breeder’s, i had that internal warning she didn’t seem on the up and up. But once i saw Muggzy i couldn’t resist. I’m s sucker especially if i think i can help an animal. I saw signs of loose stool on all of the kittens, knowing most kittens have tapeworms ,although she assured me he didn’t, and she supposidly gave him his second serries of vaccinations in front of me, once i begin to question any of the poor health signs i was voicing. Please do your research, check theses breeders out as much as possible so as you will not have to go threw what i had to with my beautiful and much missed Muggzy! !RIP

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