Caymus Receives Acupuncture from Dr. Pat Perkins, DVM, CVA

| July 22, 2011 | 5 Comments
Caymus receiving acupuncture

Caymus receiving acupuncture

On May 20, Caymus and Murphy went to the vet and the vet said that he had “unhealthy” weight loss along his spine.  They took his blood and warned mom about liver, kidney, etc. problems.  Knowing how much I love this cat, you know what this did to me on the inside!

They said if the blood work came back OK that they would need to do x-rays, sonograms, etc. to rule other things out.

I told mom that I wanted to take him to Dr. Pat Perkins (acupuncturist) because of the success she had had with Tucker.

So today my Mom and I went with Tucker and Caymus to see Dr. Perkins (the long wait because Dr. Perkins is booked solid!!).  Dr. Perkins first did acupuncture on Tucker and then when Tuck was all set, I went with Caymus to the room across the hallway (she likes to treat her patients separately).

Needles in Caymus

Needles in Caymus

Dr. Perkins was trained at the Chi Institute, which is an institute run by a Chinese man, who is like a 3rd generation acupuncturist (I could be wrong on the number – but he comes from a long line of acupuncturists).  And teaches students how to do acupuncture for cats, dogs, horses, etc.

About 6 years ago, I took Rags and Tucker to have acupuncture from someone else, but never saw these results – so I really think when considering acupuncture for your pet – it’s best to go to someone trained at the Chi Institute – there is a “Find a TCVM Practitioner” on their website.  Just put in your zip code and hit “enter” – there will be a lot vets listed (or maybe none at all) – make sure the person  has a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist(CVA) by Chi Institute and China National Society of TCVM next to their name, that means they are a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist (CVA).  All the better if they have  Certified Veterinary Chinese Herbalist(CVCH) by Chi Institute and China National Society of TCVM too – which means that they are a Certified Veterinary Chinese Herbalist (CVCH) – like Dr. Perkins.  If you live outside of the USA, there is also an area to search for practitioners outside of the USA.

Caymus receiving acupuncture

Caymus receiving acupuncture

Anyway, as soon as Pat put her hands on him, she asked me if he had been stressed out for any reason.  I told her that he had.  She said he was an “Earth” cat and therefore reacts sensitively to his family when they’re in stress.  She said that his GI Track was the problem because of where the muscles in his spine were tight.  The muscles in his spine were TIGHT – not degrading.  This tightness caused his spine to protrude.  We didn’t even know there was a GI track problem because he hasn’t had diarrhea or other outside indicators that Western medicine minds are used to (other than his spine – which we hadn’t really noticed until we went to the vet).

Based on the fact that Amy (my sister) had told me that he was acting fine to her when all this happened, it makes total sense.

Moreover, when his treatment was done – HIS PROTRUDING SPINE WAS GONE!

I don’t blame KC Cat Clinic for not knowing this – this is an Eastern Medicine understanding.  But this is what I love about Pat Perkins – she combines Eastern and Western, so you have the best of both worlds.  The world needs more miracle workers like Dr. Perkins!

Hundreds were saved by not doing xrays, sonograms, additional blood work and more importantly, Caymus REALLY benefited from clearing the blockages and releasing those muscles.

I ended staying at mom and dad’s for about 45 minutes after we got home and Caymus was SO HAPPY!  He was also hungry, but Pat didn’t want him eating for 2 hours.  He came upstairs (where I was on the computer) and rolled around on the desk, purring and stretching – as if someone had given him a new body.  I’m going to cry just thinking about it.

Caymus doesn’t need to go back unless it happens again or if he has another problem that we’d like her to see him for.  During one of Tucker’s previous appointments, Dr. Perkins had said that cats are much more in tune with their bodies and therefore will accept acupuncture more quickly than dogs and it was so cool to see how fast it happened.

Since Tuck has something completely different going on, I cannot compare the two – but it shows you that just a little something can be fixed with proper preventative care.  I am so pumped about it I could cry. One treatment and we’re done.  YAY NUSSER!

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About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

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  1. Acupuncture for Cats - Murphy's Turn | April 6, 2012
  1. Lauren says:

    I’m so sorry your kitty was not feeling well but this post almost made me cry! How remarkable that you made him feel better with holistic treatment! It’s great that you have that available to you. Sometimes I think vets do not understand our cats sensitive nature.

  2. Melody says:

    This is an amazing and very informative article! I really like this one! Honestly..doctors are not always the answer to everything, sometimes a different method works better however one profession does not surpass the either – it is simply that bodies need different things and different professionals provide more suitable options. I am glad Caymus feels better! I know he is a mellow cat in general as you describe him in your videos, but I was very surprised at exactly how mellow he is in the videos! Most cats would not like being touched like that as Caymus was being checked, his behavior is the kind of temperament that suits me the best!

    • since i had experienced rags with acupuncture and tucker, too, combined with caymus’ personality, i wasn’t terribly surprised by how mellow he was. i was amazed, though, by the results – too freakin’ cool! and the first consultation is $120 and every one after that is $60, so really not that much more than a vet visit.

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