Cat Enema – Need, Administration and Relief

| February 1, 2010 | 19 Comments

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Rags Before His Cat Enema on 6-25-08

When Rags stopped going number 2, he tried giving him all sorts of things from Metamucil to Enulose (Generic Name: lactulose (LAK too lose) to canned pumpkin. He hated it all. I also started giving him fluids, in hopes that would help the kidneys run better and help the motion of everything in that area get-a-movin!

So, as a last result, he has started getting cat enemas. I believe Rags needs this help because of his age (he’ll be 19 in two short months) and his kidneys are not functioning as they once were.

Please see photos of the procedure below.

Different vets do a cat enema different ways. Rags is currently getting his cat enemas done at Mariposa Veterinary Center in Lenexa, KS.

Before he had it done at KC Cat Clinic.

KC Cat Clinic required that he have X-rays done of his colon to see how much poop was in there, then, they would administer the enema and make him stay all day to have it done. Which costs in the upwards of $115 for everything, including, fluid therapy, day ward charge, visit/consultation, etc.

Mariposa, on the other hand, has a relatively quick and painless procedure. They only charge about $29. Dr. Chappell fills a container with water and KY jelly and mixes it up. Then she shoves a small red tube into Rags’ colon and fills the red tube (which eventually empties out into Rags’ colon) with the KY jelly and water solution and squirts it all into Rags’ colon.

Once she is done, he is put in a cage with a litter box and usually does his business in the first 5-10 minutes and then we go home.

As the owner of Rags, I am much happier with this procedure because I know Rags’ stress is kept to a minimum because he isn’t stuck at the vet all day. And certainly, I save nearly $100 by having it done at Mariposa. You cannot complain about that! I think the best thing for me was that Dr. Chappell allowed me to watch the procedure and watch my cat, so that I felt comfortable with everything that was going on.

Even though I have thought about Rags’ dignity with the photos that were taken, I am sure that he is willing to help other cats and their owners so there are a bunch of clean colons out there.

I have talked to Dr. Chappell about giving Rags enemas at home. I will be picking those up next week. So I will start giving Rags enemas at home, which I am sure he will prefer–and I will have no problem doing it, as I hate being constipated myself!

f580ea1927e5559593352b11b16ecf5d Cat Enema   Need, Administration and Relief

Rags Before His Enema on 6-25-08 – Probably dreading what’s coming…

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Rags During His Enema on 6-25-08
Vet Tech, Nicole, holds his neck and body, while Dr. Chappell administers the enema (a solution made up of water, KY Jelly and a little bit of soap!)

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Insertion of Red Enema Tube into Rags’ Colon

c09ac6309d8adcda2628ec342bf58ab6 Cat Enema   Need, Administration and Relief

Dr. Chappell lifts Rags’ tail out of the way and inserts the red enema tube into his colon and then takes a syringe and fills it with the enema solution Dr. Chappell has created (water, KY Jelly and soap)–see this solution in the silver bowl in the picture below.

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This is the red tube and the syringe before the Enema…

Rags is given 1 tablet every night of this product to help him with his pooping problems.

Enulose Information

Check out the other procedures that Rags received:

button print blu20 Cat Enema   Need, Administration and Relief

Tags: , , , ,

Category: Health Care, Ragdoll Cat, Rags

About the Author ()

Hi, I’m Jenny Dean, creator of Floppycats! Ever since my Aunt got the first Ragdoll cat in our family, I have loved the breed. Inspired by my childhood Ragdoll cat, Rags, I created Floppycats to connect, share and inspire other Ragdoll cat lovers around the world,

Comments (19)

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  1. gary says:

    We have tried everything with Max and still end up at the vet every few months for an enema and now we live in China and the vets here are dodgy at best. We have been considering doing it ourselves but have read sites that said absolutely don’t, go to a vet, you may puncture the colon. Also Max goes wild, screaming and biting which he never does so thought it would be less stressful at home. Any suggestions you got from the vet on exactly how to insert the tube to make sure you don’t puncture the colon, how far, how much fluid to use, etc…also interested in how you immobolize your cat. The China Vet tied him spreade eagle to the table which won’t happen again. Thanks much.

    • admin says:

      Gary,

      I am hesitant to offer advice in this area because not only am I not a vet tech, but nor am I a vet. I only did it on my old kitty that was in chronic renal failure. He died in March 2009 – so it has been over a year since I have done it.

      Why is Max constipated? Have you tried various foods to help him along? I hear pumpkin or squash helps – if you mix a little in his food.

      I recommend contacting Lisa A. Pierson, DVM – through her website – http://www.catinfo.org – she will help you with your questions and concerns if you donate to a cat rescue in her honor.

      With that said, with Rags, as you saw on the post – there was a small red tube. I used KY jelly to lube it up and I put it on his butt hole and on the tube. I only put it in him 3-4 inches or less.

      The solution in the syringe was a mixture of water, KY Jelly and soap – I don’t know what kind of soap she used. But I assume the least harmful there is. But the idea of the soap was lubrication.

      Rags was my cat since I was 10 years old – he was used to me doing about anything to him. But he still wasn’t a fan. Wonder why?! We (my boyfriend and I) laid him on his side. Bill held him down, while I inserted the tube and the hardest part was pushing the solution (water, KY Jelly and soap) through the syringe at a slow rate – it was hard to keep Rags still. But one time I did it too fast and he vomited – in other words – you end up pushing the poop back into his tummy – or something along those lines. I had not been warned about rupturing the colon, but rather inducing vomiting.

      As gross as this sounds – get Max used to you touching his butt hole – or around it – so that when it’s time to do the deed – he’s better about it.

      Although Enulose was encouraged – it sucked and Rags hated it. That’s not to say I woudln’t give it a go again.

      I am really sorry you and Max are struggling with this – it totally sucks. But BRAVO to you that you want to help him.

      Jenny

  2. Derik says:

    Tesla isn’t even a year old and despite a carefully followed diet she hasn’t been able to poop in five days and the vet and emergency clinic just took my money and said they don’t know what is wrong. I have been feeding her milk as a last resort which I must feed her with a syringe since she refuses to eat, drink or move at all. I needed help from my girlfriend for Tesla’s first enema but now my GF has left and I had to give her a second one on my own. It took a lot longer and I made her lay on her side while I performed her enema and I kept her calm by soothing her with my voice and waiting until she was calm, relaxed and ready. The second enema got out some really thick foul smelling stuff obviously dissolved from the first one. She seems to be feeling slightly better already so I can hardly wait to use the next one, hoping it will finish the job. I am using store-bought enema bottles that have soft tube-tips and lubricant inside the tube to be squeezed out slowly during insertion. It’s gross but fear of my beloved friend dying of constipation outweighs the gross-factor!

    • Jenny says:

      WOW – that’s pretty messed up that your vet just gave up. Milk is not good for them – but if she refuses to eat, then having something is better than nothing. Be careful on the enemas because if you go too fast with them, it can make them vomit. You have to do it really slowly. What is she eating regularly? What was she eating before she became constipated?

    • Ellie says:

      Dont use the solution that comes in the bottles! It can kill cats! Unscrew the cap, rinse it out really well and use plain water, warm, not hot. A drop or two of castile soap is fine but never any sort of saline solution that comes in those enema bottles….

  3. Patty P says:

    I appreciate the picks and information and personalized story, (re: Rags and his issues with Kidney failure and enemas!) as I am going through my own bout of dealing with a loving pet that means the world to me–yes sever Chronic C. He is having his third serious flare up now has been doing really well for a year, and almost seemed cured though I was being super careful, except for his favourite treat. Also have him on wet food with some dry that is prescribed–similar to Comfort 38 by Royal Canine, but prescription version.(which is great if not too severe, in conjunction with 2 or 3 wet meals a day…I know wet is best by my boy is not so convinced. Have had lots of health issues as a couple and that costs too so couldn’t take him to Vet this time your Vet is reasonable!!! But regardless, I have been trying enemas and seeing the pis is better than reading about it but together it is great! I think I was doing it all too quickly–s I listened and did it much, much slower like 3 or 4 X;s. Lets hope it works soon! Rags had a good long life! Here is also hoping my fella has the same!

    • Jenny says:

      Patty, Sorry to hear you are going through those struggles. I remember them all too well. What is Chronic C? Yes, slow on the enema is good – otherwise it can make them vomit if you go to fast. What’s your kitty’s name? Jenny

  4. Stan says:

    Hi,
    My older cat (16+ yrs old) Fuzzy is going through this now with his second blockage this month. I’ve tried most of the normal treatments with no luck along with multiple vet visits and manual feces removals. Currently he’s not pooping and we see the vet again tomorrow….I see enemas as a possible solution but living alone without assistance in administering the enema sounds like a problem. If someone familiar with the exact method in doing this has some suggestions I’d greatly appreciat it! Thanks. Stan

    • Patty P says:

      Hi Stan,
      I found a lot of support here, and a lot of love too. This is an aggressive disease, so you need
      all the support and encouragement you can get–so also recommend
      if you like, you can get additional help at Yahoo Groups:
      write to: Feline_Megacolon@yahoo groups I will also send you as much info as I can.
      At Yahoo groups ask for Melinda! However, the best way is to go tomorrow to the Vet or when
      you get this, and ask him
      or her to show you how to do it. One note you should get them started as soon as possible.
      Delays are not good. Use appropriate enema, always use warm water, I always boiled water
      and then let it cool to right temp, test on back of wrist, I was able to give my cat an enema by
      myself, but the first few times
      I did have my hubby stationed at his head, talking to him and petting him to distract him. You
      may be able to ask a friend who loves cats, and is good with them.The other thing is have you
      got your Kitty on Mirilax? It brings water to the bowel. Also get Vet to show you how to start
      the flow, and how to remove–also, always have flow going when you remove the enema tube
      as this can suck in tissue and cause bleeding and damage. Always lubricate the first 2 inches
      of tubing with KY Gel, (buy one enema kit–from vet or online or infant sized enema bag and tubing)
      Always rinse equipment and clean asap, using tissues to wipe and then thoroughly clean it (tubing for next use)
      Unless you can throw it away, and have another?
      If you like: Please provide email address so I can forward the
      info to you? Or give it to Jenny to forward to me–and that way it is not on the internet… All the best!

      Thanks!

      Patty

  5. Stan says:

    Patty, Thanks I’ll ask the vet whether using enemas at home is doable. Frankly, I’m afraid I’m ill equipped but we’ll see. I’ve tried miralax for like 5 months with small dollops of his wet food with minor success as well as lactylose since his “cleanout” 3 weeks ago. We’re seeing our vet in about 3 hours. All the best to you and your pet, as well as all the pets and owners out there!

    Stan
    [email protected]

  6. Nikki says:

    My husband and kids rescued a kitten a few months ago. Her tummy was extremely distended and when we brought her to the vet she was way blocked up. The vet says she has Mega Colon now and put her on enulose and cisapride. It seemed to help but slowly she was getting a bigger tummy and now it’s huge! What can we do at home as its the weekend and vets are closed? We tried using something similar to miralax and so far nothing. She is still eating (we only feed wet food) and drinking and moving which looks painful :(

  7. Patty P says:

    Hi Nikki,
    SO sorry to hear of your kittens tummy troubles! I am pretty familiar with megacolon and severe Chronic constipation as I had a wonderful older kitty with the same struggles. My boy did not like this syrup at all and fought me with this. May I ask what formulation, and dose, are you giving of the Cisapride to you kitten, and his or her weight? and age approx.
    There is a lot to take in, and sometimes you find help with conflicting information. May I suggest due to the likelihood of the lactulose (same thing as enulose,) is causing the gas and bloating which can be very painful if not relieved.. The Mirilax or other med to relieve constipation and impactions from forming will not be good taken with the enulose or lactulose, and I strongly suggest you stop both for a day, and give your kitty a piece of room temperature butter (unsalted, sweet butter is best, andit must be the genuine article) it will help kitty to pass a difficult dry piece of stool more easily, possibly–mine did it on 4 similar occassions. Also add a little butternut squash or pumpkin (from can or cooked peeled of same in a little water till soft and mashable. Keep some in glass or tupperware typle container in fridge for up to 4 or 5 days. The rest freeze in a small icecube tray for future use..
    In the meanwhile make a tisane (tea) of one of gas relievers listed later in this message. (Anise, or fennel work well. I also find chamomile tea helps kitty’s tummy to feel better too, so it doesn’t hurt–make yourself a cup of tea with a bag or loose chamomile, and let it steep for 3 to 5 min. then pour some of the liquid into a clean small mug or jar, and cool to luek warm. Now if you have syringe (no needle) clean well, and rinse well, and insert the syringe in the small mug of tea, and pull up the stopper till the tea fills the syringe tube. Pet, and brush or comb your kitty, and relax him momentarily, and then gently open his mouth enough to insert it partway in the side of his mouth (never down the throate,as this could make it go down his wind pipe and you do not want to do that. Just give him small amounts like a half a centimeter at a time (quarter inch) and do this as he swallows, and relaxed, and then do a little more, and so on. You can give the butter to him afterward, ever so gently, my boy would lick it himself off of warm toast–so if he will do that so much the better. Make sure you do not give him any meds while doing this treatment and not for several hours afterward. (Things are not moving well, yet–so we do not want a big interaction. Please read all the info below and ask Jenny for my email address if you want to or I will check tomorrow to see if you have any questions…
    But the butter, the squash or pumpkin, is safe and may really sooth your baby when he or she really needs some soothing. Please read following carefully, and try the natural remedies for now, also try very gently rubbing your kitty’s tummy to see if that offers any relief….it may help some of the gas escape. I also highly suggest you ask the Vet to give your kitty an enema to loosen things up more, and if that is help also a gentle colon massage if Vet thnks it is safe? (If it –bowel is not too packed in hard. Sometimes that will result in them wanting to give your Kitty a surgery to remove the colon. Hopefully it has not gotten to that point. Also ask the to do a seried of enemas if that will help–and perhaps they can train you over time to do them in emergencies, if you are open to that. ) Note many Vets have little to no understanding of natural rememdies, and only know about prescription meds, and diets. These remedies can help–they will not hurt, and are very affordable. They are not meant to replace good Veterinary care, but provide some comfort for you and your pet while you are waiting for things to work, and to get into see your Vet doctor.
    Symptoms of Dehydration in a Cat
    Stool Softener for Cats
    Uses

    Enulose is often given to cats to alleviate megacolon, which is persistent and severe constipation. Because it stimulates defecation, it can also help reduce the amount of ammonia that builds up in the bloodstream due to liver malfunction.
    Administration

    Enulose is an oral syrup-like medication. It can be given with food or water to make it more palatable for a cat. Plenty of fresh water should be provided to prevent side effects.
    Side Effects Cats:

    Enulose may have side effects such as increased gas, bloating and stomach cramping, which may diminish with time, but the veterinarian should be kept informed. If a cat exhibits an allergic reaction, such as diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, hives or seizures, contact a veterinarian immediately. Patients with acute appendicitis or gastrointestinal problems should not take Enulose syrup.

    (Side Effects
    in people and cats:
    Side effects may include, but are not limited to, belching, gas, abdominal cramping, and severe diarrhea. People taking Enulose syrup should check with their doctors if these symptoms persist.)

    Cats

    Read more: What Is Enulose Syrup? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5576740_enulose-syrup.html#ixzz2AfKeDDTt

    Dehydration

    Dehydration can be a sign of an overdose of Enulose. Enulose is not used to treat a cat with preexisting dehydration.
    Precautions
    Enulose should not be used with another laxative. Ensure that the prescribing vet is aware of any medications the cat is taking, including antibiotics, antacids and vitamins. Enulose can interact with these types of medications.
    Read more: Enulose for Cat Dehydration | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_6165627_enulose-cat-dehydration.html#ixzz2AfCImnGK
    Tips & Warnings

    Exercise is good for cats and can aid digestion, so engage the cat in play regularly.

    Make sure that there is always fresh water available for the cat.

    Adjust foods gradually, since dietary changes can also cause gas, as well as diarrhea.

    If the cat was ever used to having fresh air, consider taking it outside periodically.

    If other symptoms–such as regular diarrhea or vomiting–are present, seek counsel from a veterinarian, as it could indicate a more serious disorder.

    Make sure that wet food is always fresh and has not been sitting for too long.
    Hi Nikki,
    SO sorry to hear of your kittens tummy troubles! I am pretty familiar with megacolon and severe Chronic constipation as I had a wonderful older kitty with the same struggles. There is a lot to take in, and sometimes you find help with conflicting information. May I suggest due to the likelihood of the lactulose (same thing as enulose,) is causing the gas and bloating which can be very painful if not relieved.. The Mirilax or other med to relieve constipation and impactions from forming will not be good taken with the enulose or lactulose, and I strongly suggest you stop both for a day, and give your kitty a piece of room temperature butter (unsalted, sweet butter is best, andit must be the genuine article) it will help kitty to pass a difficult dry piece of stool more easily, possibly–mine did it on 4 similar occassions. Also add a little butternut squash or pumpkin (from can or cooked peeled of same in a little water till soft and mashable. Keep some in glass or tupperware typle container in fridge for up to 4 or 5 days. The rest freeze in a small icecube tray for future use..
    In the meanwhile make a tisane (tea) of one of gas relievers listed later in this message. (Anise, or fennel work well. I also find chamomile tea helps kitty’s tummy to feel better too, so it doesn’t hurt–make yourself a cup of tea with a bag or loose chamomile, and let it steep for 3 to 5 min. then pour some of the liquid into a clean small mug or jar, and cool to luek warm. Now if you have syringe (no needle) clean well, and rinse well, and insert the syringe in the small mug of tea, and pull up the stopper till the tea fills the syringe tube. Pet, and brush or comb your kitty, and relax him momentarily, and then gently open his mouth enough to insert it partway in the side of his mouth (never down the throate,as this could make it go down his wind pipe and you do not want to do that. Just give him small amounts like a half a centimeter at a time (quarter inch) and do this as he swallows, and relaxed, and then do a little more, and so on. You can give the butter to him afterward, ever so gently, my boy would lick it himself off of warm toast–so if he will do that so much the better. Make sure you do not give him any meds while doing this treatment and not for several hours afterward. (Things are not moving well, yet–so we do not want a big interaction. Please read all the info below and ask Jenny for my email address if you want to or I will check tomorrow to see if you have any questions…
    But the butter, the squash or pumpkin, is safe and may really sooth your baby when he or she really needs some soothing. Please read following carefully, and try the natural remedies for now, also try very gently rubbing your kitty’s tummy to see if that offers any relief….it may help some of the gas escape. I also highly suggest you ask the Vet to give your kitty an enema to loosen things up more, and if that is help also a gentle colon massage if Vet thnks it is safe? (If it –bowel is not too packed in hard. Sometimes that will result in them wanting to give your Kitty a surgery to remove the colon. Hopefully it has not gotten to that point. Also ask the to do a seried of enemas if that will help–and perhaps they can train you over time to do them in emergencies, if you are open to that. ) All the best! Hope your kitty gets relief soon. (There are 2 other natural rememdies I recomend too–but I think there is enough info here for now! If you want I will share them with you in a day or 2) agape! Patty
    Symptoms of Dehydration in a Cat
    Stool Softener for Cats
    Uses

    Enulose is often given to cats to alleviate megacolon, which is persistent and severe constipation. Because it stimulates defecation, it can also help reduce the amount of ammonia that builds up in the bloodstream due to liver malfunction.
    Administration

    Enulose is an oral syrup-like medication. It can be given with food or water to make it more palatable for a cat. Plenty of fresh water should be provided to prevent side effects.
    Side Effects Cats:

    Enulose may have side effects such as increased gas, bloating and stomach cramping, which may diminish with time, but the veterinarian should be kept informed. If a cat exhibits an allergic reaction, such as diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, hives or seizures, contact a veterinarian immediately. Patients with acute appendicitis or gastrointestinal problems should not take Enulose syrup.

    (Side Effects
    in people and cats:
    Side effects may include, but are not limited to, belching, gas, abdominal cramping, and severe diarrhea. People taking Enulose syrup should check with their doctors if these symptoms persist.)

    Cats

    Read more: What Is Enulose Syrup? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5576740_enulose-syrup.html#ixzz2AfKeDDTt

    Dehydration

    Dehydration can be a sign of an overdose of Enulose. Enulose is not used to treat a cat with preexisting dehydration.
    Precautions
    Enulose should not be used with another laxative. Ensure that the prescribing vet is aware of any medications the cat is taking, including antibiotics, antacids and vitamins. Enulose can interact with these types of medications.
    Read more: Enulose for Cat Dehydration | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_6165627_enulose-cat-dehydration.html#ixzz2AfCImnGK Home Remedies for Feline Gas
    Instructions
    1

    Watch how your cat eats. If your cat eats fast, this can cause gas by way of swallowed air. This can be an issue particularly if there is more than one animal in your home. The cat may be anxious, slightly intimidated and therefore eating quickly for fear that one of the other animals will take its food. Try feeding the cat in a room by itself. If there aren’t other animals, try changing the location of the food by finding a more relaxing place for it. For example, some people tend to put their pet’s food in places such as near the trash can or laundry area. Perhaps the activity or environment is making the cat anxious, which can make it eat faster than it should. Also try feeding the cat less food at each sitting and more frequently.
    2

    Check the kind of pet food being consumed. Look into the kind of foods your cat is ingesting. Cats can be lactose intolerant, just like humans. They can also have trouble digesting milk or dairy products. Eliminate one food at a time, such as milk, including cat foods that may contain it. Sometimes “people food” such as eggs or even tuna fish cannot be easily tolerated by cats. Take notes as you eliminate each food that the cat regularly eats. This could be helpful if you have to seek medical help for the cat.
    (Try canned foods like Wellness, or similar brands that are all natural and made with care. Patty)
    3 Switch pet foods. Consider those pet foods that contain less wheat, corn or soy ingredients. In particular, soy has been known to cause gas for cats. Find pet foods that contain less chemicals and lean toward being more naturally prepared. Avoid pet foods that seem particularly rich, as those foods can also cause excessive gas for cats. It may be necessary to try several cat food brands before you find one that the cat will be interested in eating, as well as tolerate.
    4

    Give the cat an anti-flatulence aid. Try using anise as an herbal remedy, to relieve gas and for healthy digestion. Fennel can also be used to help relieve gas and bloating symptoms for digestion. Foeniculum vulgare and magnesium phosphate C6 can also be effective for the relief of heartburn, gas and nausea in cats. There are also many natural products on the market, such as PetAlive Flatulence, a blend of herbal remedies designed to relieve bloating, gas and cramps. It contains no irritants such as animal products, artificial ingredients, gluten, preservatives, flavors or colors.
    Tips & Warnings

    Exercise is good for cats and can aid digestion, so engage the cat in play regularly.

    Make sure that there is always fresh water available for the cat.

    Adjust foods gradually, since dietary changes can also cause gas, as well as diarrhea.

    If the cat was ever used to having fresh air, consider taking it outside periodically.

    If other symptoms–such as regular diarrhea or vomiting–are present, seek counsel from a veterinarian, as it could indicate a more serious disorder.

    Make sure that wet food is always fresh and has not been sitting for too long.

  8. Patty P says:

    Hi Nikki, as if my message was not long enough–I just want to clarify something–if you are going to use Mirilax (very good–brings water to the bowel) then you must stop the edulose (lactulose) Since the endulose is most likely the cause of the bloating and gas you may want to take your kitten right off the syrup (endulose/lactulose) and even the Mirilax for one day just to give him a break from interactions and feeling sick. (Then back on the Mirilax daily what was prescribed? about 1/8th of a tsp. once or twice daily?) But for now you may want to just
    try the one Vet remedy for emergencies–good old-fashioned butter–about 1/2 tsp. or a little less if your kitten is really tiny. When I said tea I meant just chamomile, ( not black or other tea,) and or you can try the fennel or anise If you have one of these use it! many people will have Chamomile and is main ingredient in Sleepy Time Tea from Celestial Seasonings.. Chamomile tea is wonderful for soothing pain in the stomach and so forth. And the pumpkin or butternut squash about 1 or 2 tsp. added to his canned food, or you can even try to give it plain (not pie filling ever! it has sugar and spices) just pure pumpkin or squash is great for both constipation and megacolon and even for diarrhea. Your little guy may find lying on a soft pillow (feather, down, etc.) Soothing while he is in discomfort. A gentle all over body rub may also make him feel a bit better, and it can also help release a little gas along with the tea. If you can do this, and the butter remedy, and massage him all over gently, and even under his legs and arm pits so to speak. If he shows discomfort ease off in that area and report it to your Vet when you see her later today or tomorrow. If they delay you going in pelase ask to speak to him or her on the phone and tell the Vet of the increased gas and bloating and possible reaction to the lactulose (endulose) Take care! agape, Patty

    • Nikki says:

      She is about 9 months old and has hardly grown..my girls think she will stay little like this forever and I am starting to wonder ;) she takes 1/2 ml of enulose and .14 ml of cisapride.

      She seems to be a lot more comfortable this evening and her tummy has gone down quite a bit. My husband gave her some pumpkin with her food this morning and she loved it! Thank you so much for all the home remedies. I think that all too often a solution is always medicine and it doesn’t have to be!

      One last question too is how much food should she be eating in a day? She is like I said around 9 months but is only around 3 pounds.

  9. Patty P says:

    Hi Nikki,
    For kittens and cats with mega colon it is most widely recommended to feed moist/wet canned food. If you have a cat that has always been on dry and prefers it hugely, then there are some foods you can use, but you still have to faithful feed them the wet foods too…
    Amounts will vary depending on how nutrition packed the food is too–though a half a cup is minimum–I hope she is eating that or more? I had a fairly fine boned Himalayan and he was eating 2/3 or so of dry, (hairball control first, and years later the prescription diet from Royal Canine for intestinal problems; and a couple of spoonfuls of wet food, mixed with a little water from the kettle
    2 to 3 times a day. I am saying rounded tsp. so half a small can a day at most–cats that are really active and have a high metabolic rate will easily eat 1 & 1/2 small cans to 2 whole small cans. With the addition of the pumpkin, I think your kitty will find it a lot more soothing to her tummy, and she will gradually be able to ingest more food. Add some extra water to the canned food as cats generally are borderline dehydrated, and need more water, and megacolon kitties need it even moreso. Some cats prefer the canned food to be pureed or smoothe, and others prefer to really chew the food, and like it chunky. Go by what she prefers, and use that to your advantage.
    Chicken–a high quality brand that is natural based, is the best choice to help her gain some needed weight. That will help her to put on more weight, as you want her to be minimal 6 lb. unless she is a teacup size.
    also–I am guessing she has been wormed (dewormed…)? As that can also cause bloating and weight loss. You may want to check into that if she has not been treated for worms by your Vet? Though deal with the megacolon first! Has she had a BM in the last 2 days or do? Also do you know what her breed is, or is she a Heinz 57? No matter, all cats are beautiful–and amazing, especially if they are loved.
    Keep the pumpkin up!
    all the best,

    Patty

    • Nikki says:

      She is eating at a minimum of 1 can a day. The best quality canned food for cats is fancy feast. Is that ok or should I be ordering her food? She always seems to be hungry.

      She has had a Bm is the last 2 days though it has been with the help of my husband. She might get a piece part way out so he helps her by rubbing the lower tummy area. And it is very solid.

      She was dewormed at her first vet check and is strictly indoor. We have done a routine maintenance on the deworming at vets advise.

      The vet believes she is part house breed and part Manx as she has no tail. She is a cute little kitty with long thick black fur with some white hairs randomly through her coat. My girls love to just hold her and pet her.

  10. Patty P says:

    Hi Nikki,

    Sounds like you are really getting tuned into your kittty, and her problem!
    OK, use the Fancy feast, as she likes it, and it is a bit better than some other choices, but suggest you try her with Chicken Wellness–for digestion, etc. And try to get her to eat it at least half of the time?
    Also there are a few other brands like: ‘Life’s Abundance Premium Natural Healthy Cat Foods. You can look then up on the Web, and order their canned Food.
    I was doing some research, and was thinking perhaps your kitten is also part Munchkin? They are very small as adults usually starting at or between 4-8 lbs tops.
    Does she have short legs? Anyway, if you can add in some of the Wellness, you can get it at Global Pet Food Stores, and at some others, I believe. I think the other one you have to order–try it out first, and if she likes it I will send you a link some one gave me for reg. shipments, with a discount. I am in no way affiliated–these are just 2 company’s I have always heard good things about–I have used Wellness and the sooner you get them on it the better. Continue the pumpkin daily, and of course–if she can not make a BM or ‘poop’ on her own, then you will need the Cisapride once or twice a day depending on how week she is. I would strong suggest you wean her off of the enulose, and put her on Miriax, and it can be mixed into her food daily, as it is tasteless and odourless, and very effective provided they get it at least every second day. Hope this helps! She sure sounds like a sweetheart!

  11. Susi says:

    Hi Nikki,
    Your kitty has what is called “Manx cat syndrome”. I rescued a litter of kittens about a week old, three years ago. 4 out of the 5 had no tails. The one little male started having problems with bowel movement when they started to eat solid food. At first he had to have some enemas, wound up with a mega colon, but it is now managed with lactulose and cisapride. He gets 1.5 mls cisapride and 3 mls lactulose 2x per day. What happens to some cats born without tails (rumpeys) is that the end of their spine and the nerves there are not formed ( no tail). So the nerves that help the colon push the poop out are not there or not working properly. The cisapride helps to stimulate what nerves they have and the lactulose helps to keep things soft enough to move through. Ramses doesn’t like wet food even though it is the best for him. If your cat will eat wet food keep her on that. There are much better cat foods than fancy feast if you want to spend the money for them…Avoderm,, natures variety, merrick brand food etc…..found at petco or Petsmart. Our vet said to keep an eye on his BMs and adjust the lactulose accordingly. You don’t want diarrehea but no too hard either. Kind of soft serve. Good luck….these cats used to be put down but with care they can live long happy lives!
    Susi

  12. Patty P says:

    Hi Nikki,

    I would like to reiterate that many have had a lot more success with Mirilax (or Peg3500) than lactulose, and it is taking some Vets time to come up to date with that info. Lactulose is often a real pain to administer for many people, and while it can be good for short term use it has issues for the long term….and our MC or Cronic Constipated cats sometimes have a real problem with it. (Not to mention the mess!) For long term use Mirilax is a really good choice, as it is tasteless, bring water to the gut…and one can easily add a little warm water to the soft food, and stir the Mirilax into this. I start at 1/8 tsp. for a really small cat or older cat. And 1/4 for a bigger cat. However you can adjust the dose slightly in either direction–depending on your pet’s needs.
    Also Wellness is a highly recommended food by many who have the same problem–as well as Apo. etc. Read the label, some of Wellness has human grade chicken–a far cry from the diseased or dying livestock, (old beyond belief–nice way for a faithful old friend to go? More and more horses are getting turned into pet food.
    Cats, domestic felines should be eating animals that they can actually take as prey in the Ferrel world. (These would often include: mice, rats & for some, rabbits, small birds–a waste! and chickens, a small turkey, etc.) I had a Burmese I rescued, this was when I was a lot younger–and we lived on the shores of Lake Huron…and he actually fished! He actually caught a big white fish! Cats will also eat tender grasses, and squash, pumpkin–has to be steamed or cooked, as cats cannot break down these kinds of raw veggies, but they do benefit from them. Even a little
    cooked carrot, size of a tsp. remember they are small animals. Also really important to stimulate their interest in drinking fresh water daily. Some will only drink water from a moving source. Also cats love clean–so do use a little vinegar an a few drops of dish soap and hot water to clean their dishes thoroughly a couple to 3 times a week. Of course wet food dishes per use. I change pet water every day. If it has any chlorine I put it through a filter like Brita, or Shaklee filters, etc. Brushing and massaging also helps. Keep treats to a minimum–and you can get healthy recipes on line for making fresh treats. Also a little bit of kefir or yogourt is fine for some cats too–even strawberry flavours (natural) and a 1/4 tsp. of banana in a tsp. of plain yogourt makes it palatable to cats and kittens, the key here is moderation–a little is good. (I am in Ontario Canada, and use a wee bit of Pinehedge or Saugeen. Both are excellent, and organic.(Or use a small amt. of lactobacillis from a yogourt capsule–about 1/3 of a capsule’s powdered contents per day. I alsways start introducing it on the back of my hand. Then after that I sprinkle it daily on the top of the wet food. (If you add a little water to wet food cats often prefer it, and get a little more water in that way! )

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